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commit 76b512a25d2f444a154cb40d9ab4c1cdaccab4e2
parent 15f74d889fc9d95043ac10f7f640ecb33fbe692e
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Sat, 11 Apr 2020 01:22:06 -0400

Publish new blog post

Diffstat:
Mpages/blog.md | 1+
Apages/blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server.md | 67+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Mpages/home.md | 4++--
Mpublic/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml | 67+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Mpublic/sitemap.xml | 1+
5 files changed, 138 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)

diff --git a/pages/blog.md b/pages/blog.md @@ -20,6 +20,7 @@ href="https://social.paritybit.ca/@jbauer">Mastodon</a>. ### 2020 <ul> + <li>2020-04-11 <a href="blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server">Decommissioning My Rackmount Server</a></li> <li>2020-04-07 <a href="blog/housecleaning">Doing Some House Cleaning</a></li> <li>2020-02-28 <a href="blog/logo-redesign">Redesigning My Website's Logo</a></li> <li>2020-02-24 <a href="blog/making-my-own-vim-statusline">Making My Own Vim Statusline</a></li> diff --git a/pages/blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server.md b/pages/blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server.md @@ -0,0 +1,67 @@ +## Decommissioning My Rackmount Server + +[//]: # "I love self-hosting stuff because of the control it gives me over my own data. However, I had a rackmount server that was way too loud, power-hungry, and hot. I decided to get rid of it for some serious improvements." + +[//]: # "main.min.css" + +[//]: # + +<div class="byline"> +<b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | + <b>Posted:</b> 2020-04-11 | + <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-04-11 + </div> + +I love self-hosting stuff. It allows me to exercise system administration skills +and allows me to be in control of my data. I try to do this as cheaply as +possible which includes keeping my power usage down. Not only is power +efficiency light on my wallet, more importantly it's better for the environment. +Power-efficient things also typically need less cooling which leads to lower +noise output from those machines. + +My Dell R415 rackmount server was basically the antithesis of all of those +values. It was hot, loud, and sucked down 200W when _idle_. All for a meagre 8 +threads and 16GB of RAM. + +Although I got this server for a really good price ($95 USD, shipping included), +the reason that I got it for such a low price was because the hardware isn't +particularly high-end. It came with 16GB of RAM which is more than enough for my +needs but the problem is that it has two AMD Opteron 4130 CPUs which run at +2.26GHz and have 4 cores each with _no simultaneous multithreading_. + +One morning, I decided to run some benchmarks on my server versus one of my +spare laptops which couldn't function as a laptop anymore due to missing the +screen. I used the program `stress` to run some CPU, RAM, and I/O benchmarks and +to my surprise, my spare laptop with its i5-2450M (2 cores and 4 threads) beat +my server by about 33% in both CPU and RAM benchmarks although it was +unsurprisingly slower I/O-wise. + +I had previously been using this laptop as a server to collect mail from my +virtual machines and it had been running as long as the R415 so I knew it could +reliably function as a server even though I would lose things like hard disk +redundancy. + +I decided I was fed up with the noise and heat from the R415 and decided to +switch over that same afternoon. + +I first installed Proxmox on the laptop, added both machines to a cluster, used +the migrate feature built in to Proxmox to move all of the VMs to the laptop, +and finally powered down and removed the R415 from the cluster. Silence at last. + +Once I finished moving around hardware (I am using a [Lack +Rack](https://wiki.eth0.nl/index.php/LackRack)), I powered everything back on +again and noticed that this new configuration was only drawing 65W on average +and that's for my _entire_ homelab. Where my entire homelab used to draw about +240W, it now draws 27% of what it used to and it's almost completely silent +while doing it. + +The laptop sits at around 15% CPU and 45% RAM utilization with all of my +virtualized services running and I haven't experienced any slowness in using +them. Although I don't have redundant hard drives with this laptop, I do still +back up all of my VMs and configurations which means I'd have probably only a +few hours downtime if the hard drive fails. It's something I can live with in +exchange for what the laptop offers. + +You can get more detailed information about the specs of my lab machines over on +the page [about what I use](https://www.paritybit.ca/uses#ServerEquipment). +Suffice to say, I'm now very happy with what I have. diff --git a/pages/home.md b/pages/home.md @@ -21,6 +21,8 @@ page](/about). src="/img/feed-icon.png" width="15" height="15" alt="Click for RSS Feed"/> </a> </div> +2020-04-11 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server">Decommissioning My Rackmount Server</a> + 2020-04-07 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/housecleaning">Doing Some House Cleaning</a> 2020-02-28 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/logo-redesign">Redesigning My Website's Logo</a> @@ -39,8 +41,6 @@ page](/about). 2019-12-21 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/arguing-effectively">How to Argue Effectively</a> -2019-12-21 <a class="feed-item" href="projects/usrmnt">Initial usrmnt Release</a> - ### What is a Parity Bit? It is a bit (in the 1's and 0's sense) used in checking for errors in digital diff --git a/public/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml b/public/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml @@ -7,6 +7,73 @@ <description>The feed that covers all notable additions, updates, announcements, and other changes for the entire paritybit.ca website.</description> <item> + <title> Decommissioning My Rackmount Server</title> + <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server</link> + <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server</guid> + <pubDate>Sat, 11 Apr 2020 01:18:52 -0400</pubDate> +<description><![CDATA[<h2>Decommissioning My Rackmount Server</h2> + +<div class="byline"> +<b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | + <b>Posted:</b> 2020-04-11 | + <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-04-11 + </div> + +<p>I love self-hosting stuff. It allows me to exercise system administration skills +and allows me to be in control of my data. I try to do this as cheaply as +possible which includes keeping my power usage down. Not only is power +efficiency light on my wallet, more importantly it's better for the environment. +Power-efficient things also typically need less cooling which leads to lower +noise output from those machines.</p> + +<p>My Dell R415 rackmount server was basically the antithesis of all of those +values. It was hot, loud, and sucked down 200W when <em>idle</em>. All for a meagre 8 +threads and 16GB of RAM.</p> + +<p>Although I got this server for a really good price ($95 USD, shipping included), +the reason that I got it for such a low price was because the hardware isn't +particularly high-end. It came with 16GB of RAM which is more than enough for my +needs but the problem is that it has two AMD Opteron 4130 CPUs which run at +2.26GHz and have 4 cores each with <em>no simultaneous multithreading</em>.</p> + +<p>One morning, I decided to run some benchmarks on my server versus one of my +spare laptops which couldn't function as a laptop anymore due to missing the +screen. I used the program <code>stress</code> to run some CPU, RAM, and I/O benchmarks and +to my surprise, my spare laptop with its i5-2450M (2 cores and 4 threads) beat +my server by about 33% in both CPU and RAM benchmarks although it was +unsurprisingly slower I/O-wise.</p> + +<p>I had previously been using this laptop as a server to collect mail from my +virtual machines and it had been running as long as the R415 so I knew it could +reliably function as a server even though I would lose things like hard disk +redundancy.</p> + +<p>I decided I was fed up with the noise and heat from the R415 and decided to +switch over that same afternoon.</p> + +<p>I first installed Proxmox on the laptop, added both machines to a cluster, used +the migrate feature built in to Proxmox to move all of the VMs to the laptop, +and finally powered down and removed the R415 from the cluster. Silence at last.</p> + +<p>Once I finished moving around hardware (I am using a <a href="https://wiki.eth0.nl/index.php/LackRack">Lack +Rack</a>), I powered everything back on +again and noticed that this new configuration was only drawing 65W on average +and that's for my <em>entire</em> homelab. Where my entire homelab used to draw about +240W, it now draws 27% of what it used to and it's almost completely silent +while doing it.</p> + +<p>The laptop sits at around 15% CPU and 45% RAM utilization with all of my +virtualized services running and I haven't experienced any slowness in using +them. Although I don't have redundant hard drives with this laptop, I do still +back up all of my VMs and configurations which means I'd have probably only a +few hours downtime if the hard drive fails. It's something I can live with in +exchange for what the laptop offers.</p> + +<p>You can get more detailed information about the specs of my lab machines over on +the page <a href="https://www.paritybit.ca/uses#ServerEquipment">about what I use</a>. +Suffice to say, I'm now very happy with what I have.</p>]]></description> +</item> +<item> <title> Doing Some House Cleaning</title> <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/housecleaning</link> <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/housecleaning</guid> diff --git a/public/sitemap.xml b/public/sitemap.xml @@ -3,6 +3,7 @@ <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/home</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog</loc></url> + <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/housecleaning</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/logo-redesign</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/making-my-own-vim-statusline</loc></url>