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commit 82723cfba98c5ae3de4a7f32e6d696ffc62197c9
parent b43ddc7b00093d89bec0836ee65d1fd0c492dbcb
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Mon, 19 Sep 2022 15:44:12 -0400

*

Diffstat:
Mcontent/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi | 2+-
1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)

diff --git a/content/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi b/content/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi @@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ That's not even counting that you can buy 250GB or 1TB storage cards, which is a Then there's the argument that these ports allow for upgrades of existing ports or changing to a new port standard. If you can upgrade an older SD card slot to one that supports faster speeds, that's way better than having an old and now less useful SD card slot built into the computer. This is definitely an advantage of the modular ports and why I don't want to see them disappear but, at the same time, an increase in speed also needs to come with a motherboard that supports it. If the Framework has 4 recessed USB-C ports that are all USB4 20Gbps, you're limited to that no matter the speed supported by a new port. For example, HDMI 2.0 has a maximum bandwidth of 18Gbps, but HDMI 2.1 has a maximum bandwidth of 48Gbps so it doesn't matter if your HDMI expansion card theoretically supports a resolution of 8K 120Hz if the laptop simply cannot do that. -Now, this is still nice because you can just upgrade your expansion cards and motherboard and keep the rest of the laptop (battery, screen, keyboard, etc.) which is undoubtedly good, but there's also no reason that we can't also have built-in, denser I/O. Even 5Gbps USB speeds and older HDMI/DisplayPort standards are fast enough for most people's uses today and have been for the past decade (many people get by just fine with resolutions at 4K 60Hz or lower which has been supported since HDMI 2.0 (2013) and DisplayPort 1.2 (2010)). USB thumb drives and external SSDs aren't that limited by USB 3.0 5Gbps speeds either. These ports don't need to be upgraded every couple of years or even every decade; those speeds are fast enough for the majority of uses these days and for the foreseeable future. +Now, this is still nice because you can just upgrade your expansion cards and motherboard and keep the rest of the laptop (battery, screen, keyboard, etc.) which is undoubtedly good, but there's also no reason that we can't also have built-in, denser I/O. Even 5Gbps USB speeds and older HDMI/DisplayPort standards are fast enough for most people's uses today and have been for the past decade (many people get by just fine with resolutions at 4K 60Hz or lower which has been supported since HDMI 2.0 (2013) and DisplayPort 1.2 (2010)). Most commonly available USB thumb drives and external SSDs aren't that limited by USB 3.0 5Gbps speeds either, if at all. These ports don't need to be upgraded every couple of years or even every decade; those speeds are fast enough for the majority of uses these days and for the foreseeable future. These modular ports also just end up being much more inconvenient compared to an all-in-one dongle which might have 2 USB-A 5Gbps ports, 2 USB-C ports, HDMI, and a card reader in one combined, less expensive package that's not much larger than two of the Framework expansion cards put together ([Here's an example on Amazon](https://www.amazon.com/Anker-Upgraded-Delivery-Pixelbook-A83460A2/dp/B07ZVKTP53/ref=sr_1_4)). If you want to switch up your ports instead of just picking a loadout and sticking with it, you end up with a lot of these expansion cards that you have to carry with you or throw in a drawer at your desk (one for Ethernet, another USB-A, maybe a different display connector, etc.). It's way less convenient to carry around a box of the Framework ports to be able to reconfigure your ports on the fly when you can just carry around a single dongle that has all the extra ports you might need, even if you don't use some of the ports on that dongle. Not to mention the cost of all the extra Framework expansion cards compared to the cost of that one dongle.