paritybit.ca

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commit 86a02908ecffe1457417b55203be773bc4444740
parent 7b3e1901398473a191c521f306c1654ff3903de1
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Wed, 10 Jun 2020 00:50:14 -0400

Publish new blog post

Diffstat:
Mpages/blog.md | 1+
Apages/blog/setting-up-a-status-page.md | 64++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Mpages/home.md | 4++--
Mpublic/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml | 21+++++++++++++++++++++
Mpublic/sitemap.xml | 1+
5 files changed, 89 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)

diff --git a/pages/blog.md b/pages/blog.md @@ -20,6 +20,7 @@ href="https://social.paritybit.ca/@jbauer">Mastodon</a>. ### 2020 <ul> + <li>2020-06-09 <a href="blog/setting-up-a-status-page">Setting Up a Status Page</a></li> <li>2020-06-08 <a href="blog/scripting-my-way-to-success">Scripting My Way to Success</a></li> <li>2020-06-07 <a href="blog/curating-my-blogroll">Curating My Blogroll</a></li> <li>2020-06-07 <a href="blog/why-email-is-the-best-discussion-platform">Why Email is the Best Discussion Platform</a></li> diff --git a/pages/blog/setting-up-a-status-page.md b/pages/blog/setting-up-a-status-page.md @@ -0,0 +1,64 @@ +## Setting Up a Status Page + +[//]: # "META_TEXT" + +[//]: # "main.min.css" + +[//]: # + +<div class="byline"> +<b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | + <b>Posted:</b> 2020-06-09 | + <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-06-09 +</div> + +I've wanted to have a status page for my services for a while so that others and +I can get a quick look at which of them are experiencing downtime. Ideally, I +would also receive notifications when unexpected downtime is expected. + +I figured I would use something like SmokePing or a simple set of scripts and a +basic webpage but in either case I'd have to spend another $3.50-$5.00 per month +on a VPS so that I'd have a unique host from which to monitor all the rest. I +didn't particularly fancy spending that much just to ping my servers, so when I +found out about [UptimeRobot](https://uptimerobot.com/), I was very intrigued. + +They provide status monitoring for with notifications and a webpage with two +plan options. There's a free plan which allows one to receive email alerts, set +up 50 monitors, and monitor each as fast as once every 5 minutes. They appear to +make their money off of providing a paid plan which allows monitoring an +increased number of hosts as fast as once every minute among other things. + +After having a read through their Privacy Policy and deciding it seemed quite +reasonable, I decided to make an account and try it out. I plan to stick with +the free plan since I don't need any of the features that the paid plan is +offering. + +The configuration panel on the site is very simple (in a good way). Everything +is clearly laid out and very easy to navigate and interact with. Two factor +authentication is offered and was painless to set up, and adding new hosts is +very easy as is setting up the web page which displays a summary of your +statistics. I set up my monitoring page at +[status.paritybit.ca](https://status.paritybit.ca). + +I looked around at this status page and noticed that it only transfers ~73KB of +data with a cold cache which is quite good. This is with Google fonts blocked +since I noticed that the site was making requests to the following URLs: + +``` +fonts.gstatic.com +fonts.googleapis.com +``` + +As much as I'd prefer if the site didn't make these third party requests, they +are easy enough to blog using DNS filtering like PiHole or with uBlock origin's +custom filters. + +So far, my experience has been very good with it. I like that the service and +configuration are simple and the web page it generates is not super heavy. I +may, in future, roll my own status page but this seems like a sufficient +solution for now. + +_This is my fortieth post for the +[#100DaysToOffload](https://social.paritybit.ca/tags/100DaysToOffload) +challenge. You can learn more about this challenge over at +[https://100daystooffload.com](https://100daystooffload.com)._ diff --git a/pages/home.md b/pages/home.md @@ -20,6 +20,8 @@ extent)! Access through `gopher://paritybit.ca` or `gemini://paritybit.ca`. src="/img/feed-icon.png" width="15" height="15" alt="Click for RSS Feed"/> </a> </div> +2020-06-09 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/setting-up-a-status-page">Setting Up a Status Page</a> + 2020-06-08 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/scripting-my-way-to-success">Scripting My Way to Success</a> 2020-06-07 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/curating-my-blogroll">Curating My Blogroll</a> @@ -37,8 +39,6 @@ extent)! Access through `gopher://paritybit.ca` or `gemini://paritybit.ca`. 2020-05-28 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/a-quick-rant-about-web-font-sizes">A Quick Rant About Web Font Sizes</a> 2020-05-27 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/i-like-perl">I Like Perl</a> - -2020-05-26 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/choosing-a-self-hosted-git-service">Choosing a Self-Hosted Git Service</a> ### What is a Parity Bit? It is a bit (in the 1's and 0's sense) used in checking for errors in digital diff --git a/public/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml b/public/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml @@ -7,6 +7,27 @@ <description>The feed that covers all notable additions, updates, announcements, and other changes for the entire paritybit.ca website.</description> <item> + <title>Setting Up a Status Page</title> + <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/setting-up-a-status-page</link> + <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/setting-up-a-status-page</guid> + <pubDate>Tue, 09 Jun 2020 23:58:37 -0400</pubDate> +<description><![CDATA[<h2 id="setting-up-a-status-page">Setting Up a Status Page</h2> +<div class="byline"> +<p><b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | <b>Posted:</b> 2020-06-09 | <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-06-09</p> +</div> +<p>I’ve wanted to have a status page for my services for a while so that others and I can get a quick look at which of them are experiencing downtime. Ideally, I would also receive notifications when unexpected downtime is expected.</p> +<p>I figured I would use something like SmokePing or a simple set of scripts and a basic webpage but in either case I’d have to spend another $3.50-$5.00 per month on a VPS so that I’d have a unique host from which to monitor all the rest. I didn’t particularly fancy spending that much just to ping my servers, so when I found out about <a href="https://uptimerobot.com/">UptimeRobot</a>, I was very intrigued.</p> +<p>They provide status monitoring for with notifications and a webpage with two plan options. There’s a free plan which allows one to receive email alerts, set up 50 monitors, and monitor each as fast as once every 5 minutes. They appear to make their money off of providing a paid plan which allows monitoring an increased number of hosts as fast as once every minute among other things.</p> +<p>After having a read through their Privacy Policy and deciding it seemed quite reasonable, I decided to make an account and try it out. I plan to stick with the free plan since I don’t need any of the features that the paid plan is offering.</p> +<p>The configuration panel on the site is very simple (in a good way). Everything is clearly laid out and very easy to navigate and interact with. Two factor authentication is offered and was painless to set up, and adding new hosts is very easy as is setting up the web page which displays a summary of your statistics. I set up my monitoring page at <a href="https://status.paritybit.ca">status.paritybit.ca</a>.</p> +<p>I looked around at this status page and noticed that it only transfers ~73KB of data with a cold cache which is quite good. This is with Google fonts blocked since I noticed that the site was making requests to the following URLs:</p> +<pre><code>fonts.gstatic.com +fonts.googleapis.com</code></pre> +<p>As much as I’d prefer if the site didn’t make these third party requests, they are easy enough to blog using DNS filtering like PiHole or with uBlock origin’s custom filters.</p> +<p>So far, my experience has been very good with it. I like that the service and configuration are simple and the web page it generates is not super heavy. I may, in future, roll my own status page but this seems like a sufficient solution for now.</p> +<p><em>This is my fortieth post for the <a href="https://social.paritybit.ca/tags/100DaysToOffload">#100DaysToOffload</a> challenge. You can learn more about this challenge over at <a href="https://100daystooffload.com" class="uri">https://100daystooffload.com</a>.</em></p>]]></description> +</item> +<item> <title>Scripting My Way to Success</title> <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/scripting-my-way-to-success</link> <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/scripting-my-way-to-success</guid> diff --git a/public/sitemap.xml b/public/sitemap.xml @@ -3,6 +3,7 @@ <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/home</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog</loc></url> + <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/setting-up-a-status-page</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/scripting-my-way-to-success</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/curating-my-blogroll</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/why-email-is-the-best-discussion-platform</loc></url>