paritybit.ca

Unnamed repository; edit this file 'description' to name the repository.
Log | Files | Refs | README | LICENSE

commit 887eea14d9841463769cd4677ccc660912e053c8
parent 477e3b6092e497960d2e6082f20402265a23182a
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Sun,  1 Nov 2020 23:13:44 -0500

Revise email blog posts

Diffstat:
Mhttp/pages/blog/preparing-to-self-host-email.md | 51+++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------------------
Mhttp/pages/blog/self-hosting-email.md | 33+++++++++++++++------------------
2 files changed, 40 insertions(+), 44 deletions(-)

diff --git a/http/pages/blog/preparing-to-self-host-email.md b/http/pages/blog/preparing-to-self-host-email.md @@ -9,37 +9,37 @@ <div class="byline"> <b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | <b>Posted:</b> 2020-05-15 | - <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-05-15 + <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-11-01 </div> Email is one of the oldest and most fundamental underpinnings of the Inernet as a whole. Unfortunately, it has a reputation of being very difficult to self-host, let alone self-host correctly. I've seen many online talk about the -issues they've run into getting their mail past the spam filters of the Big Mail +issues they've run into getting their mail past the spam filters of Big Mail Corps or keeping their servers safe against the onslaught of crackers trying to gain access which eventually leads them to give up on self-hosting email and -return to using Big Mail Corps. +return to using proprietary services from the likes of Google or Microsoft. -Despite all this, I think that self-hosting email is one of the best ways to -take control of your data and be digitally independent. Regardless of which -email provider you choose, there is always the posibility that they could shut -down, intercept and analyze your emails and sell that data to advertisers, or to -block you from using their service. If you're dependent on email (which I'm sure -many of us are to a certain extent), this can be a serious problem. +Despite all this, I think self-hosting email is one of the best ways to take +control of your data and become digitally independent. Regardless of which email +provider you choose, there is always the possibility that they could shut down, +analyze your emails and sell that data to advertisers, or block you from using +their service. If you're dependent on email (which I'm sure many of us are to a +certain extent), this is something to be concerned about. I am currently with ProtonMail. My only complaint, now that they've open-sourced all of their client applications, is that I have to use the ProtonMail Bridge, and therefore be a paying user, in order to be able to interact with my email -using open protocols like IMAP and SMTP. It's also somewhat annoying that I have -to have a separate (electron-based) application running any time I wanted to -send or receive email. I understand why they do it, but it's still something I -wish I didn't have to deal with. Besides, I'm also coming to terms with the fact -that email is almost a completely public form of communication; the only way -that I can be sure that my communications are secure is by using PGP-based -encryption with my emails, or a separate secure messaging system like Matrix. I -wish this wasn't the case, but with nearly every email passing through Big Mail -Corp's servers and being stored unencrypted in most others' mailboxes, it seems -an unavoidable truth. +using open, standard protocols like IMAP and SMTP. It's also somewhat annoying +that I have to have a separate (electron-based) application running any time I +wanted to send or receive email. I understand why they do it, but it's still +something I wish I didn't have to deal with. Besides, I'm also coming to terms +with the fact that email is almost a completely public form of communication; +the only way that I can be sure that my communications are secure is by using +PGP-based encryption with my emails, or a separate secure messaging system like +Matrix. With nearly every email passing through servers belonging to Google or +Microsoft and being stored unencrypted in most others' mailboxes, it seems an +unavoidable truth. This is the first time I'll attempt to properly self-host email. I've previously set up mail communication inside my LAN and I have experience with SPF, DKIM, @@ -56,15 +56,14 @@ I plan to run my mailserver using a hosted VPS because I don't have a static IP at my house and I need more reliable infrastructure for a service as critical as email. Although this somewhat lessens my digital independence, since the VPS provider could theoretically shut down or ban me, I think it's the best solution -given my circumstances right now. Right now, I'm going with Vultr because -they've been highly recommended to me, they have good hosting rates, and they -offer deployment of OpenBSD VPSes. Here is a [referral +given my circumstances right now. I chose to go with Vultr because they've been +highly recommended to me, they have good hosting rates, and they offer +deployment of OpenBSD VPSes. Here is a [referral link](https://www.vultr.com/?ref=8575855-6G) if you'd like to give them a try -while supporting me. It will give you a $100 credit which is a good amount to -try the service without commitment. If, for whatever reason, the link above -doesn't work, here is an [alternative referral +while supporting me. That link will give you a 30-day, $100 credit (if, for +whatever reason, the link above doesn't work, here is an [alternative referral link](https://www.vultr.com/?ref=8575845) which won't give you a credit but does -still reward me. +still reward me). As the final component, I plan to first trial a setup using a spare domain which I own: `jbauer.ca`, just in case things don't work out well. I wouldn't want to diff --git a/http/pages/blog/self-hosting-email.md b/http/pages/blog/self-hosting-email.md @@ -9,21 +9,18 @@ <div class="byline"> <b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | <b>Posted:</b> 2020-05-16 | - <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-05-16 + <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-11-01 </div> I just finished setting up self-hosted email and it was the easiest thing ever. As I discussed in my [previous blog post](/blog/preparing-to-self-host-email), I -set up a VPS with [Vultr](https://www.vultr.com/?ref=8575845) running OpenBSD -(that's a regular referral link, [this one will give you a $100 -credit](https://www.vultr.com/?ref=8575855-6G)). Following this [guide from one -of the developers of +set up a VPS with Vultr running OpenBSD. Following this [guide from one of the +developers of OpenSMTPD](https://poolp.org/posts/2019-09-14/setting-up-a-mail-server-with-opensmtpd-dovecot-and-rspamd/) -(I think he may be the creator), I was able to get the server up and running in -less than two hours while understanding every step and every configuration -option along the way. None of it felt like the black magic that it was made out -to be by many on the Internet. +, I was able to get the server up and running in less than two hours while +understanding every step and every configuration option along the way. None of +it felt like the black magic that it was made out to be by many on the Internet. To test the setup, I created the email address `me@jbauer.ca` and set up Thunderbird. I tested sending and receiving emails and checked, using Wireshark, @@ -39,7 +36,7 @@ configured: I also used [MXToolBox.com](https://mxtoolbox.com) to test that my mail server and DNS records were correctly configured. This service was invaluable since I -can't test Port 25 connectivity to the mail server from my residential +can't test port 25 connectivity to the mail server from my residential connection. <figure> @@ -48,14 +45,14 @@ connection. results with all green checkmarks."/></a> </figure> -As of yet, I haven't had much trouble getting my email delivered to different -addresses from Big Mail Corps which was what I was most worried about and which -is an often-cited factor many use to advocate against self-hosting email. So -far, I've confirmed that both Gmail and ProtonMail deliver my mail. Microsoft's -Office 365 marked my IP as being spam—which is understandable since it's a brand -new mail server on a previously-unused domain—but not only did they notify me -that I was put on their spam list, they offered a really easy way to remove my -IP from the list: +As of yet, I haven't had much trouble getting my email delivered to the +addresses controlled by the Big Mail Corporations which was what I was most +worried about and which is an often-cited factor many use to advocate against +self-hosting email. So far, I've confirmed that both Gmail and ProtonMail +deliver my mail. Microsoft's Office 365 marked my IP as being spam—which is +understandable since it's a brand new mail server on a previously-unused +domain—but not only did they notify me that I was put on their spam list, they +offered a really easy way to remove my IP from the list: <figure> <a href="/img/office-365-spam.png"><img src="/img/office-365-spam-thumb.png"