paritybit.ca

Unnamed repository; edit this file 'description' to name the repository.
Log | Files | Refs | README | LICENSE

commit 9ad02e15972df4c38ad2abbf746ae8b74a0abd4b
parent f08e80ab28a346183d6242615fe8c707f7e5ee11
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Tue,  7 Jan 2020 18:15:10 -0500

Re-word about-site page

Diffstat:
Mpages/about-site.md | 70++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------------------------------
1 file changed, 32 insertions(+), 38 deletions(-)

diff --git a/pages/about-site.md b/pages/about-site.md @@ -12,42 +12,36 @@ I created this website as a place for me to share my projects, thoughts on various computing and computer science topics, configuration files, tips and tricks, and other things that I think others could find useful. -The code for this website <a href=#1>[1]</a> is licensed under the -GPL-3.0-or-later. I chose this license because of what the license stands for -and what I see my website being used for. I think people should be able to audit -everything about my site and if they take my code and distribute it I want them -to also share what they've done to the code with the world. Free software is -beneficial to the software development ecosystem and I want to continue -supporting that model. - -The content for this website is licensed under the Creative Commons -Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. I chose this license for the -content because I have no problem with people sharing or doing what they want -with the things that I post or make available on the website, so long as they -don't try to pass off the work as their own. +The code for this website <a href=#1>[1]</a> (including the javascript) is +licensed under the GPL-3.0-or-later. The content for this website is licensed +under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. I +have no problem with people sharing or doing what they want with the things that +I post or make available on the website, so long as they don't try to pass off +the work as their own and don't try to make it closed-source. ### Privacy Unlike many companies and organizations nowadays, I respect the privacy of those -who visit my website and use my services. I do this by not collecting any -information (other than what's saved in my nginx logs), by not using tracking -cookies (or any cookies at all), and by building a website that doesn't rely on -an insane amount of impossible-to-audit scripts, obfuscated code, or sketchy ad -platforms. I don't monetize my website using ad services or paywalls because I -believe in giving back to the community the knowledge that I have gained and the -things that I have created for free and without hassle. +who visit my website and use my services. Aside from what your browser sends me +when it makes a request (e.g. your IP address), I don't collect any personally +identifying information. The information that your browser sends to me is just +stored in the server logs and isn't sold to anybody. I don't use cookies and all +of the code on the website is transparent. I believe in giving back to the +community the knowledge that I have gained and the things that I have created +for free and without hassle. ### Design I designed this website with the principles of minimalism and simplicity in mind. There is no client-side JavaScript except where necessary on project -pages, the server backend is simply nginx serving static pages, and there aren't -any resource-hogging images or superfluous animations to distract from the -important stuff: the content. The website has been themed in this dark colour -scheme because I found it to be easier to look at (especially at night). I took +pages, the server backend is simply nginx serving static pages, and I've taken +steps to optimize the pages so that they load quickly and aren't heavy. I took an article by Drew DeVault <a href=#2>[2]</a> as inspiration for the philosophy -behind the design of this website. This site may not be flashy, hip, or even all -that pretty, but it is simple, easy to use, and fast. +behind the design of this website. + +The website has been themed in this dark colour scheme because I found it to be +easier to look at (especially at night). This site may not be flashy, hip, or +even all that pretty, but it is simple, easy to use, and fast. ### The Technical Side @@ -57,16 +51,16 @@ without any warning, it's safe to assume that it's due to factors outside of my control like ISP infrastructure failures or a power-outage which would cause the server to shut down to prevent data loss. -The pages themselves are written in the Markdown markup language with bits of -HTML sprinkled in as necessary. This is then compiled into HTML, has a header -and footer stuck on to it, gets its title, meta tag, and CSS links set, and is -released as a fully-formed HTML webpage. Because of the ease of writing in -Markdown and then being able to translate that into HTML, it just made sense to -do it this way instead of manually writing all of the HTML. +The pages themselves are written in Markdown with bits of HTML added when +needed. This is then compiled into HTML, has a header and footer stuck on to it, +gets its title, meta tag, and CSS links set, and is released as a fully-formed +HTML webpage. Because of the ease of writing in Markdown and then being able to +translate that into HTML, it just made sense to do it this way instead of +manually writing all of the HTML. -Of course I could use a static site generator or some other program but I enjoy -finding my own way to do things since it represents a fun challenge and is a way -to practice/develop my spaghettification skills. +Of course I could use a static site generator like [Hugo](https://gohugo.io/) or +some other program but I enjoy doing things myself as a challenge and as a way +to learn. The CSS for the website is sent through a CSS minifier to make it as small as possible for serving to clients. The service I use is linked below @@ -75,10 +69,10 @@ compilation script. Once the pages and necessary accompanying files are created and compiled, the files are uploaded to the website into a folder called `uploads/` using the -`rsync -rR` command so that the parent folders are also copied along with the -file. On the web server, a script runs which detects changes in this `uploads/` +command `rsync -rR` so that the parent folders are also copied along with the +file. On the web server, a script runs which detects changes in the `uploads/` directory and copies the files it finds, maintaining the folder structure, into -the website's directory. +the directory from which the site is served. All of the scripts used can be found in the aforementioned git repository.