paritybit.ca

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commit aee01f580279170610ca77a865939a9e25a3a085
parent 333f87129962f3c019ba7a45ee73afca4fac87cc
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Wed,  8 Jul 2020 00:11:51 -0400

Publish new blog post

Diffstat:
Mpages/blog.md | 5++++-
Mpages/blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time.md | 83++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-----------
Mpages/home.md | 8++++----
Mpublic/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml | 63++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-
Mpublic/sitemap.xml | 2++
5 files changed, 144 insertions(+), 17 deletions(-)

diff --git a/pages/blog.md b/pages/blog.md @@ -12,7 +12,8 @@ Subscribe with RSS</a> <form action="https://duckduckgo.com/" method="get"> <input name="sites" type="hidden" value="www.paritybit.ca/blog"> - <input aria-label="Search this blog." name="q" type="text" placeholder="Search This Blog"> + <input aria-label="Search this blog." name="q" type="text" + placeholder="Search This Blog"> <button aria-label="Submit search query.">&#128270;</button> </form> @@ -26,6 +27,8 @@ href="https://social.paritybit.ca/@jbauer">Mastodon</a>. ### 2020 <ul> + <li>2020-07-07 <a href="blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time">Are TODO Applications a Waste of Time?</a></li> + <li>2020-07-06 <a href="blog/improving-blog-searching">Improving Blog Searching</a></li> <li>2020-07-05 <a href="blog/switching-to-cgit">Switching to cgit</a></li> <li>2020-07-04 <a href="blog/generating-my-geek-code">Generating My Geek Code</a></li> <li>2020-07-03 <a href="blog/adding-search-to-my-blog">Adding Search to my Blog</a></li> diff --git a/pages/blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time.md b/pages/blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time.md @@ -8,24 +8,85 @@ <div class="byline"> <b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | - <b>Posted:</b> [DATE] | - <b>Last Updated:</b> [DATE] + <b>Posted:</b> 2020-07-07 | + <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-07-07 </div> -Today the following video by Derek Taylor popped up on my feed and got me -thinking about TODO applications: [Are TODO Applications Hindering Your +A few days ago, the following video by Derek Taylor popped up on my feed and got +me thinking about TODO applications: [Are TODO Applications Hindering Your Productivity?](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcxZj2qh4Kw) ([invidio.us link](https://invidio.us/watch?v=BcxZj2qh4Kw)). Some points that he mentioned resonated with me, though I think he is slightly wrong in his conclusion. -- todos can be helpful but can be a time-sink -- todos are a good way to list down tasks to accomplish -- one can end up falling into the trap of getting organized as a way to feel - productive, rather than tackling the tasks themselves (e.g. spending hours - making a bullet journal nice instead of working on the assignment due - tomorrow) +He basically said: TODO applications hinder your productivity because you spend +more time organizing your tasks instead of just doing them, they trick you into +thinking you're getting things done when, in reality, you're just giving +yourself little boosts of dopamine by checking off trivial things, and it sets +you up for failure since humans typically over-estimate how much can be done in +a day. On the whole, I agree with what he says, but I don't think TODO +applications are useless or hinder your productivity and there are ways, when +applied correctly, that they can be helpful. -_This is my fifty-ninth post for the +I have seen in other people and experienced myself the draw to get organized +before beginning a task and then spending more time coming up with or setting up +this "perfect" organization system that will prepare me to accomplish tasks +effectively. However, this hypothetical "perfect" system I was creating was +really just a way to procrastinate on the task at hand by making myself feel +like I was being productive and contributing to the completion of the task. In +reality, if I just wrote down a list of things to do and got working, the task +would have been done a lot sooner. + +I have also experienced the urge to write down every little thing I need to do +in a day and religiously check it off as, essentially, a way to feel productive. +This I have a less strong opinion about because it can be a big help on days +where motivation levels are low and distractions are high. I've found completing +small tasks and getting those boosts of dopamine to be a good way to kick-start +me into tackling the larger tasks of the day. It's like starting a car engine on +a cold day: turn the engine over a few times and eventually it'll spring to life +and become self-sustaining. The problem here arises when one stops at just doing +the small tasks, is satisfied with those tiny boosts of dopamine, and doesn't do +anything else from there. + +Overestimation is a big human problem. We frequently overestimate how much we +can accomplish in an hour, let alone a day. This frequently leads to situations +where we expect to get a lot done so we create a huge list of things to do and +then feel bad when we couldn't accomplish what we thought we could. This is a +trapping that one has to be aware of and avoid when planning their days or +getting organized. + +Essentially, TODO lists or TODO applications are not the problem here, it's +people using them as a procrastinative and as a way to feel productive instead +of actually doing the things that need to be done which is the problem. In +reality, a well-curated, disorganized, simple checklist can be as or more +effective than a well-organized, pretty TODO system that has had a lot of +thought and work put into it. TODO lists and applications aren't useless, they +just enable productivity anti-patterns and one has to be aware of those +anti-patterns to make effective use of TODO lists and applications. + +Don't let the illusion of productivity that TODO lists and applications invite +become a procrastinative outlet or substitute for doing the actual tasks. + +_**Note**: Procrastinative isn't a real word. Except it is now cause I just made +it up:_ + +<div class="note"> +**Procrastinative**, n. or adj. /prəˈkrastənatɪv/ + +1 : (n.) A thing someone uses to procrastinate. + +* "Social media is a procrastinative." + +2 : (adj.) Used to describe an object which is frequently used to procrastinate. + +* "I have a procrastinative game collection." +* "This deck of cards is my procrastinative outlet." + +3 : (adj.) A feeling that describes one's desire to procrastinate. + +* "I'm feeling very procrastinative today." +</div> + +_This is my sixty-third post for the [#100DaysToOffload](https://social.paritybit.ca/tags/100DaysToOffload) challenge. You can learn more about this challenge over at [https://100daystooffload.com](https://100daystooffload.com)._ diff --git a/pages/home.md b/pages/home.md @@ -20,6 +20,10 @@ extent)! Access through `gopher://paritybit.ca` or `gemini://paritybit.ca`. src="/img/feed-icon.png" width="15" height="15" alt="Click for RSS Feed"/> </a> </div> +2020-07-07 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time">Are TODO Applications a Waste of Time?</a> + +2020-07-06 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/improving-blog-searching">Improving Blog Searching</a> + 2020-07-05 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/switching-to-cgit">Switching to cgit</a> 2020-07-04 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/generating-my-geek-code">Generating My Geek Code</a> @@ -35,10 +39,6 @@ extent)! Access through `gopher://paritybit.ca` or `gemini://paritybit.ca`. 2020-06-26 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/use-syncthing-to-sync-things">Use Syncthing to Sync Things</a> 2020-06-26 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/why-dwm-swallowing-cant-swallow-tmux">Why dwm's Window Swallowing Patch Can't Swallow tmux</a> - -2020-06-23 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/switching-to-debian-sid">Switching to Debian Sid</a> - -2020-06-22 <a class="feed-item" href="blog/my-lwn-theme">My LWN Theme</a> ### What is a Parity Bit? It is a bit (in the 1's and 0's sense) used in checking for errors in digital diff --git a/public/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml b/public/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml @@ -7,6 +7,67 @@ <description>The feed that covers all notable additions, updates, announcements, and other changes for the entire paritybit.ca website.</description> <item> + <title>Are TODO Applications a Waste of Time?</title> + <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time</link> + <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time</guid> + <pubDate>Tue, 07 Jul 2020 23:59:50 -0400</pubDate> + <description><![CDATA[<h2 id="are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time">Are TODO Applications a Waste of Time?</h2> +<div class="byline"> +<p><b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | <b>Posted:</b> 2020-07-07 | <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-07-07</p> +</div> +<p>A few days ago, the following video by Derek Taylor popped up on my feed and got me thinking about TODO applications: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcxZj2qh4Kw">Are TODO Applications Hindering Your Productivity?</a> (<a href="https://invidio.us/watch?v=BcxZj2qh4Kw">invidio.us link</a>). Some points that he mentioned resonated with me, though I think he is slightly wrong in his conclusion.</p> +<p>He basically said: TODO applications hinder your productivity because you spend more time organizing your tasks instead of just doing them, they trick you into thinking you’re getting things done when, in reality, you’re just giving yourself little boosts of dopamine by checking off trivial things, and it sets you up for failure since humans typically over-estimate how much can be done in a day. On the whole, I agree with what he says, but I don’t think TODO applications are useless or hinder your productivity and there are ways, when applied correctly, that they can be helpful.</p> +<p>I have seen in other people and experienced myself the draw to get organized before beginning a task and then spending more time coming up with or setting up this “perfect” organization system that will prepare me to accomplish tasks effectively. However, this hypothetical “perfect” system I was creating was really just a way to procrastinate on the task at hand by making myself feel like I was being productive and contributing to the completion of the task. In reality, if I just wrote down a list of things to do and got working, the task would have been done a lot sooner.</p> +<p>I have also experienced the urge to write down every little thing I need to do in a day and religiously check it off as, essentially, a way to feel productive. This I have a less strong opinion about because it can be a big help on days where motivation levels are low and distractions are high. I’ve found completing small tasks and getting those boosts of dopamine to be a good way to kick-start me into tackling the larger tasks of the day. It’s like starting a car engine on a cold day: turn the engine over a few times and eventually it’ll spring to life and become self-sustaining. The problem here arises when one stops at just doing the small tasks, is satisfied with those tiny boosts of dopamine, and doesn’t do anything else from there.</p> +<p>Overestimation is a big human problem. We frequently overestimate how much we can accomplish in an hour, let alone a day. This frequently leads to situations where we expect to get a lot done so we create a huge list of things to do and then feel bad when we couldn’t accomplish what we thought we could. This is a trapping that one has to be aware of and avoid when planning their days or getting organized.</p> +<p>Essentially, TODO lists or TODO applications are not the problem here, it’s people using them as a procrastinative and as a way to feel productive instead of actually doing the things that need to be done which is the problem. In reality, a well-curated, disorganized, simple checklist can be as or more effective than a well-organized, pretty TODO system that has had a lot of thought and work put into it. TODO lists and applications aren’t useless, they just enable productivity anti-patterns and one has to be aware of those anti-patterns to make effective use of TODO lists and applications.</p> +<p>Don’t let the illusion of productivity that TODO lists and applications invite become a procrastinative outlet or substitute for doing the actual tasks.</p> +<p><em><strong>Note</strong>: Procrastinative isn’t a real word. Except it is now cause I just made it up:</em></p> +<div class="note"> +<p><strong>Procrastinative</strong>, n. or adj. /prəˈkrastənatɪv/</p> +<p>1 : (n.) A thing someone uses to procrastinate.</p> +<ul> +<li>“Social media is a procrastinative.”</li> +</ul> +<p>2 : (adj.) Used to describe an object which is frequently used to procrastinate.</p> +<ul> +<li>“I have a procrastinative game collection.”</li> +<li>“This deck of cards is my procrastinative outlet.”</li> +</ul> +<p>3 : (adj.) A feeling that describes one’s desire to procrastinate.</p> +<ul> +<li>“I’m feeling very procrastinative today.”</li> +</ul> +</div> +<p><em>This is my sixty-third post for the <a href="https://social.paritybit.ca/tags/100DaysToOffload">#100DaysToOffload</a> challenge. You can learn more about this challenge over at <a href="https://100daystooffload.com">https://100daystooffload.com</a>.</em></p>]]></description> + </item> +<item> + <title>Improving Blog Searching</title> + <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/improving-blog-searching</link> + <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/improving-blog-searching</guid> + <pubDate>Mon, 06 Jul 2020 20:37:52 -0400</pubDate> + <description><![CDATA[<h2 id="improving-blog-searching">Improving Blog Searching</h2> +<div class="byline"> +<p><b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | <b>Posted:</b> 2020-07-06 | <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-07-06</p> +</div> +<p>A few days ago I posted about <a href="https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/adding-search-to-my-blog">the really simple solution I came up with for searching on my blog</a>. Since then, I’ve had <a href="https://social.paritybit.ca/web/statuses/104451892409302622">a few good replies</a> about ways I could make it better. One suggestion in particular fit with the themes and goals of this website so I went ahead and implemented it to improve the search experience on my site.</p> +<h3 id="evaluating-other-suggestions">Evaluating Other Suggestions</h3> +<p>First, let’s talk about some of the other suggestions made. There was the suggestion from Amolith of <a href="https://secluded.site">secluded.site</a> that I use a tiny, JavaScript-less, static search engine called <a href="https://endler.dev/2019/tinysearch/">Tiny Search</a> and the suggestion from Kev Quirk of <a href="https://kevq.uk">kevq.uk</a> who mentioned that DuckDuckGo provides <a href="https://duckduckgo.com/search_box">an embeddable search bar</a> in the form of an iframe. Both were great suggestions, but let’s look at why I think they wouldn’t work for my site.</p> +<p>Tiny Search is a really clever and interesting project, but it achieves its functionality through WebAssembly. WebAssembly is a new web technology created to allow web-native apps to run far faster and far more efficiently than if they were written in JavaScript. Unfortunately, this means that basically only the three big browser engines support it: Gecko (Firefox), Blink (Chrome and its derivatives), and WebKit (Safari and its derivatives). That means anybody browsing my site with an alternative browser such as Lynx or w3m won’t be able to make use of it. I could provide a fallback, but the other reason why I didn’t choose it is because it advertises itself as being between “50kB-100kB gzipped” which is very large when put in context with the average size of one of my pages being 10-20kB for an entire page, or ~6-7kB for just the HTML.</p> +<p>I played around with Kev’s suggestion of the DuckDuckGo iframe and it worked quite well and was very easy to generate and add to my page. However, it had the same issues as Tiny Search where it would balloon the size of the blog page by up to 3x its original size, and it would make 3 third-party requests to load in the necessary assets. Also, iframes are not supported by Lynx or w3m but it was trivial to add a fallback for those browsers. The main issues that I had with this method were the third party requests and large size of the loaded assets.</p> +<p>To summarize, I didn’t go with the above two suggestions because of the use of unsupported technology in browsers which I target and because of the size of the assets which would be required to make them functional. Both are trivial in the context of many contemporary sites, but I like to keep my site as slim as possible and I like to maintain compatibility with alternative browsers.</p> +<h3 id="the-solution-i-chose">The Solution I Chose</h3> +<p>However, <a href="https://oscarbenedito.com/">Oscar Benedito</a> suggested something which caught my eye and which I didn’t even know was possible: a form that makes a request to DuckDuckGo. This solution uses technology that has been supported in every web browser for decades and adds mere bytes to the size of the page since it’s just a plain HTML form. This is what I have which now powers my site’s search:</p> +<div class="sourceCode" id="cb1"><pre class="sourceCode html"><code class="sourceCode html"><a class="sourceLine" id="cb1-1" title="1"><span class="kw">&lt;form</span><span class="ot"> action=</span><span class="st">&quot;https://duckduckgo.com/&quot;</span><span class="ot"> method=</span><span class="st">&quot;get&quot;</span><span class="kw">&gt;</span></a> +<a class="sourceLine" id="cb1-2" title="2"> <span class="kw">&lt;input</span><span class="ot"> name=</span><span class="st">&quot;sites&quot;</span><span class="ot"> type=</span><span class="st">&quot;hidden&quot;</span><span class="ot"> value=</span><span class="st">&quot;www.paritybit.ca/blog&quot;</span><span class="kw">&gt;</span></a> +<a class="sourceLine" id="cb1-3" title="3"> <span class="kw">&lt;input</span><span class="ot"> aria-label=</span><span class="st">&quot;Search this blog.&quot;</span><span class="ot"> name=</span><span class="st">&quot;q&quot;</span><span class="ot"> type=</span><span class="st">&quot;text&quot;</span></a> +<a class="sourceLine" id="cb1-4" title="4"><span class="ot"> placeholder=</span><span class="st">&quot;Search This Blog&quot;</span><span class="kw">&gt;</span></a> +<a class="sourceLine" id="cb1-5" title="5"> <span class="kw">&lt;button</span><span class="ot"> aria-label=</span><span class="st">&quot;Submit search query.&quot;</span><span class="kw">&gt;</span><span class="dv">&amp;#128270;</span><span class="kw">&lt;/button&gt;</span></a> +<a class="sourceLine" id="cb1-6" title="6"><span class="kw">&lt;/form&gt;</span></a></code></pre></div> +<p>That’s it! Instead of a link to a DuckDuckGo search where users would have to type their search query in after clicking it, users can now type their query into this form and they will be sent to a DuckDuckGo page with the results. This still improves the UX while keeping the page small and using features supported in browsers like Lynx and w3m.</p> +<p><em>This is my sixty-second post for the <a href="https://social.paritybit.ca/tags/100DaysToOffload">#100DaysToOffload</a> challenge. You can learn more about this challenge over at <a href="https://100daystooffload.com">https://100daystooffload.com</a>.</em></p>]]></description> + </item> +<item> <title>Switching to cgit</title> <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/switching-to-cgit</link> <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/switching-to-cgit</guid> @@ -235,7 +296,7 @@ IsTerminal: 1 NoSwallow: 0 IsFloating: 0 Tags: 0 -Scratchkey: +Scratchkey: IN MANAGE(): term: (nil) Applying rules to client org.pwmt.zathura IN MANAGE(): term: 0x5626932ad110 &lt;--- No tmux diff --git a/public/sitemap.xml b/public/sitemap.xml @@ -3,6 +3,8 @@ <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/home</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog</loc></url> + <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time</loc></url> + <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/improving-blog-searching</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/switching-to-cgit</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/generating-my-geek-code</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/adding-search-to-my-blog</loc></url>