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commit b43ddc7b00093d89bec0836ee65d1fd0c492dbcb
parent 9348e1d3c8e67ba92c9e996f446eb03502669bf1
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Mon, 19 Sep 2022 15:42:54 -0400

*

Diffstat:
Mcontent/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi | 2+-
1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)

diff --git a/content/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi b/content/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi @@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ There are only 4 available expansion slots on the Framework. One of them must be That's not even counting that you can buy 250GB or 1TB storage cards, which is a really cool idea since it's basically like an integrated USB thumb drive or spare hard disk that you can plug and unplug from your laptop like it's an old Thinkpad UltraBay, but you lose a whole port of I/O when they're plugged in. Also, if you use them like regular USB thumb drives, well, a regular USB thumb drive is going to be way more convenient since you won't have to fiddle with a latch on the bottom of the laptop just to disconnect the drive. -Then there's the argument that these ports allow for upgrades of existing ports or changing to a new port standard. If you can upgrade an older SD card slot to one that supports faster speeds, that's way better than having an old and now less useful SD card slot built into the computer. This is definitely an advantage of the modular ports and why I don't want to see them disappear but, at the same time, an increase in speed also needs to come with a motherboard that supports it. If the Framework has 4 recessed USB-C ports that are all USB4 20Gbps, you're limited to that no matter the speed supported by a new port. For example, HDMI 2.0 has a maximum bandwidth of 18Gbps, but HDMI 2.1 has a maximum bandwidth of 48Gbps so it doesn't matter if your HDMI expansion card theoretically supports 8K 120Hz resolutions if the laptop simply cannot do that. +Then there's the argument that these ports allow for upgrades of existing ports or changing to a new port standard. If you can upgrade an older SD card slot to one that supports faster speeds, that's way better than having an old and now less useful SD card slot built into the computer. This is definitely an advantage of the modular ports and why I don't want to see them disappear but, at the same time, an increase in speed also needs to come with a motherboard that supports it. If the Framework has 4 recessed USB-C ports that are all USB4 20Gbps, you're limited to that no matter the speed supported by a new port. For example, HDMI 2.0 has a maximum bandwidth of 18Gbps, but HDMI 2.1 has a maximum bandwidth of 48Gbps so it doesn't matter if your HDMI expansion card theoretically supports a resolution of 8K 120Hz if the laptop simply cannot do that. Now, this is still nice because you can just upgrade your expansion cards and motherboard and keep the rest of the laptop (battery, screen, keyboard, etc.) which is undoubtedly good, but there's also no reason that we can't also have built-in, denser I/O. Even 5Gbps USB speeds and older HDMI/DisplayPort standards are fast enough for most people's uses today and have been for the past decade (many people get by just fine with resolutions at 4K 60Hz or lower which has been supported since HDMI 2.0 (2013) and DisplayPort 1.2 (2010)). USB thumb drives and external SSDs aren't that limited by USB 3.0 5Gbps speeds either. These ports don't need to be upgraded every couple of years or even every decade; those speeds are fast enough for the majority of uses these days and for the foreseeable future.