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git clone https://git.sr.ht/~jbauer/paritybit.ca
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commit e2b398005817329bdb5d7ce997a72a86dd8cff53
parent 176072f21a1f4ba6a523e57b95a67abe097689ea
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Mon, 19 Sep 2022 15:15:18 -0400

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Mcontent/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi | 45+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Dcontent/garden/plots/framework-laptop.gmi | 21---------------------
Mcontent/garden/plots/index.gmi | 1-
Mcontent/garden/plots/os-project.gmi | 4++++
Mcontent/garden/plots/philosophy-software-development.gmi | 5+++++
Mcontent/links.md | 17+++++++----------
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diff --git a/content/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi b/content/garden/arboretum/opinions/computing-hardware.gmi @@ -1,5 +1,50 @@ # Computing Hardware Opinions +## Framework + +**GENERALLY POSITIVE** (Last Updated: 2022-09-19) + +I don't have a Framework laptop simply because I don't need a new laptop right now. However, if I had to purchase a brand new laptop today, I would probably choose this one. Most of these thoughts are based on the videos I've seen and accounts from people I know who have one. + +Here's a good review from someone with similar priorities in laptops to myself: + +=> https://jcs.org/2021/08/06/framework + +Some positives: + +* Excellent repairability compared to most other modern laptops +* Excellent resolution, 200DPI, 13.5" glossy display +* Good company ethos and track record so far (offering standalone motherboards and top case lids for upgrades) +* Plenty of spare parts available for purchase; repair guides and schematics also available +* Keyboard has a good amount of travel compared to other contemporary laptops +* Performance is quite good with 12th-gen Intel processors +* It is quite portable thanks to its size and weight + +Some negatives: + +* Screen/lid is flimsy and doesn't feel like a quality part compared to Dell XPS or MacBook, (supposedly that has been improved in the latest iteration?) +* The number of ports is limited and the whole modular port idea isn't really that compelling compared to just having lots of I/O (more below) +* Battery life is sub-par (~6 hours for normal use) +* Aesthetically, I prefer the squared/boxy looks of the MacBooks compared to this angular look of the Framework and other laptops, but that's not a big deal + +### A Rant About Modular Ports + +TL;DR: What I'm saying is that, while the modular port idea is kind of cool, the level of I/O available for the Framework is not any better than most contemporary laptops and they don't live up to the purpose they're marketed for (eliminating dongles). In a lot of relatively common usecases, it doesn't eliminate the need for a typical dongle or docking station with even more ports. I'd much rather have way more, denser I/O on a replaceable circuit board (which would also enable repairability and upgradability) in the Framework than these expansion ports, or have a combination of the two solutions. We can keep one or two of these expansion slots and at the same time have a collection of two or three USB-A ports, two USB-C ports, and a display connector just built into the laptop like how laptops used to be in the era of PCMCIA cards. That's a level of I/O sure to garner a lot of praise while keeping the aspects that are good about the expansion slots. + +While at first the idea of modular ports seems really cool and compelling, I would liken it more to a gimmick than a useful feature compared to the alternative. The big issue with these ports is that you're not only paying a sizeable amount of extra money for what are essentially recessed, single-purpose USB-C dongles ($12 a piece for USB-A and C, $25 for display connectors or SD card, $51 for ethernet (prices in CAD)), you're also quite limited in terms of the number of slots available. + +There are only 4 available expansion slots on the Framework. One of them must be USB-C if you wish to charge so that leaves 3 choices. Many will then choose one HDMI or DisplayPort to be able to hook the laptop up to an external monitor or projector and the final 2 might be another USB-C to be able to charge on the other side of the laptop and a USB-A to be able to plug in some peripheral, USB stick, or external drive. So, that's likely 2 USB-C, 1 USB-A, and one HDMI/DisplayPort. Not a lot of I/O for $61 CAD (roughly $46 USD) worth of single-use dongles. + +That's not even counting that you can buy 250GB or 1TB storage cards, which is a really cool idea since it's basically like an integrated USB thumb drive or spare hard disk that you can plug and unplug from your laptop like it's an old Thinkpad UltraBay, but you lose a whole port of I/O when they're plugged in. Also, if you use them like regular USB thumb drives, well, a regular USB thumb drive is going to be way more convenient since you won't have to fiddle with a latch on the bottom of the laptop just to disconnect the drive. + +Then there's the argument that these ports allow for upgrades of existing ports or changing to a new port standard. If you can upgrade an older SD card slot to one that supports faster speeds, that's way better than having an old and now less useful SD card slot built into the computer. This is definitely an advantage of the modular ports and why I don't want to see them disappear but, at the same time, an increase in speed also needs to come with a motherboard that supports it. If the Framework has 4 recessed USB-C ports that are all USB4 20Gbps, you're limited to that no matter the speed supported by a new port. For example, HDMI 2.0 has a maximum bandwidth of 18Gbps, but HDMI 2.1 has a maximum bandwidth of 48Gbps so it doesn't matter if your HDMI expansion card theoretically supports 8K 120Hz resolutions if the laptop simply cannot do that. + +Now, this is still nice because you can just upgrade your expansion ports and motherboard and keep the rest of the laptop (battery, screen, keyboard, etc.) which is undoubtedly good, but there's also no reason that we can't also have built-in, denser I/O. Even 5Gbps USB speeds and older HDMI/DisplayPort standards are fast enough for most people's uses today and have been for the past decade (many people get by just fine with resolutions at 4K 60Hz or lower which has been supported since HDMI 2.0 (2013) and DisplayPort 1.2 (2010)). USB thumb drives and external SSDs aren't that limited by USB 3.0 5Gbps speeds either. These ports don't need to be upgraded every couple of years or even every decade; those speeds are fast enough for the majority of uses these days and for the foreseeable future. + +These modular ports also just end up being much more inconvenient compared to an all-in-one dongle which might have 2 USB-A 5Gbps ports, 2 USB-C ports, HDMI, and a card reader in one combined, less expensive package that's not much larger than two of the Framework expansion ports put together ([Here's an example on Amazon](https://www.amazon.com/Anker-Upgraded-Delivery-Pixelbook-A83460A2/dp/B07ZVKTP53/ref=sr_1_4)). If you want to switch up your ports instead of just picking a loadout and sticking with it, you end up with a lot of these expansion cards that you have to carry with you or throw in a drawer at your desk (one for Ethernet, another USB-A, maybe a different display connector, etc.). It's way less convenient to carry around a box of the Framework ports to be able to reconfigure your ports on the fly when you can just carry around a single dongle that has all the extra ports you might need, even if you don't use some of the ports on that dongle. Not to mention the cost of all the extra Framework expansion cards compared to the cost of that one dongle. + +Yes, you're not going to have a dongle hanging off your laptop with the built-in, swappable ports but that doesn't matter if the I/O in the laptop is too limited anyways because there simply aren't enough ports for what you need. If you want to "dock" your Framework to a workstation with two monitors, a keyboard, and a mouse, you're still going to need a dongle because there won't be any ports left to charge your laptop. If you want to hook up a thumb drive, keyboard, and mouse while charging, you'll still need a dongle because you won't have enough ports left for any external displays. If we had enough ports on our laptops in the first place, we wouldn't need dongles at all. Framework didn't solve this, they just said they did. + ## Thinkpads **NEGATIVE** (Last Updated: 2022-08-29) diff --git a/content/garden/plots/framework-laptop.gmi b/content/garden/plots/framework-laptop.gmi @@ -1,21 +0,0 @@ -# Reviewing the Framework Laptop - -* Excellent repairability compared to most other modern laptops -* Excellent resolution 200DPI display -* Good company ethos and so far track record (offering standalone motherboards and top case lids for upgrades) -* The selection of ports is okay, but the whole modular port idea isn't really that compelling (more below) -* Screen/lid is flimsy and doesn't feel like a quality part compared to Dell XPS or MacBook - -## A Digression About Modular Ports - -While at first the idea of modular ports seems really cool and compelling, I would liken it more to a gimmick than a useful feature. The big issue with these ports is that you're not only paying extra money for what are essentially recessed, single-purpose USB-C dongles ($12 a piece for USB-A and C, $25 for display connectors or SD card, $51 for ethernet (prices in CAD)), you're also quite limited in terms of the number of slots available. - -There are only 4 available expansion slots on the Framework. One of them must be USB-C if you wish to charge so that leaves 3. Many people will likely want to be able to charge from either side of the laptop, as this is a convenience of most modern laptops, so that likely leaves 2 free ports for most people. Many will then choose one USB-A and one HDMI or DisplayPort as this is a relatively universal set that will let you plug your mouse, keyboard, or USB stick into the USB-A port and maybe hook up the laptop to an external monitor or projector using the display connector. - -So, that's likely 2 USB-C, 1 USB-A, and one HDMI/DisplayPort. Not a lot of I/O. Compare this to the latest 14" MacBook Pro which has 3 USB-C ports, an HDMI, a dedicated charging port, and an SD card reader. The latest Dell XPS 15 has 3 USB-Cs and one SD card slot, which is about the same level of I/O as the Framework. My Dell Latitude has 3 USB-As, HDMI, compact ethernet, one USB-C, a dedicated charge port, and a micro-SD card slot; tons of I/O (and if we got rid of the compact ethernet and barrel plug in favour of another two USB-C ports, it could be as thin as the Framework too). That's not even counting that you can buy 250GB or 1TB storage dongles, which is a really cool idea since it's basically like an integrated USB thumb drive or spare hard disk that you can plug and unplug from your laptop, but you lose a whole port of I/O if you keep them plugged in. Also, if you use them like regular USB thumb drives, well, a regular USB thumb drive is going to be way more convenient since you won't have to fiddle with a latch on the bottom of the laptop just to disconnect the drive. - -These modular ports end up being much more inconvenient compared to an all-in-one dongle which might have 2 USB-A 5Gbps ports, 2 USB-C ports, HDMI, and a card reader in one simple, inexpensive package not much larger than two of the Framework expansion ports combined ([Here's an example on Amazon](https://www.amazon.com/Anker-Upgraded-Delivery-Pixelbook-A83460A2/dp/B07ZVKTP53/ref=sr_1_4)). If you want to switch up your ports instead of just picking a loadout and sticking with it, you end up with a lot of these expansion cards (one for Ethernet, another USB-A, maybe a different display connector, etc.) you have to carry with you. It's way less convenient to carry around a box of the Framework ports to be able to reconfigure your ports on the fly when you can just carry around a single dongle that has all the extra ports you might need, even if you don't use some of the ports on that dongle. Yes, you're not going to have a dongle hanging off your laptop with the built-in, swappable ports but that doesn't matter if the I/O in the laptop is too limited anyways because there simply aren't enough ports for what you need. If we had enough ports on the Framework laptop in the first place, we wouldn't need a dongle at all. - -Then there's the argument that these ports allow for upgrades of existing ports or changing to a new port standard. If you can upgrade an older SD card slot to one that supports faster speeds, that's way better than having an old and now less useful SD card slot built into the computer. This is definitely an advantage of the modular ports and why I don't want to see them disappear but, at the same time, an increase in speed also needs to come with a motherboard that supports it. If Framework has 4 recessed USB-C ports that are all 20Gbps, you're limited to that no matter the speed supported by a new dongle. Now, this is still nice because you can just upgrade your expansion ports and motherboard and keep the rest of the laptop (battery, screen, keyboard, etc.) which is undoubtedly good, but there's also no reason that we can't also have built-in, denser I/O. Even 5Gbps USB speeds, HDMI 2.1, or DisplayPort 2.0 are fast enough for most people's uses today and have been for a decade or more (those display standards support high refresh rate 8K video with HDR, which is far beyond what most people really need). They don't really need to be upgraded every couple of years, or even every decade. Who's to say USB-C will continue to be the standard for the next several decades either? - -Really what I'm saying is that, while the modular port idea is kind of cool, the level of I/O available for the Framework is less than I want and I'd much rather also have way more, denser I/O on replaceable boards (which would allow easy repairability and also allow you to upgrade your ports to a newer standard!). We can keep one or two of these expansion slots and at the same time have a collection of two USB-A ports, two USB-C ports, and a display connector just built into the laptop, like how we used to do it with PCMCIA cards. That's a level of I/O sure to garner a lot of praise from the press and users, while keeping the parts that are good about the expansion slots. diff --git a/content/garden/plots/index.gmi b/content/garden/plots/index.gmi @@ -20,7 +20,6 @@ The Plots are where active projects live. Here you can find actively worked on t => macos-evaluation.gmi Evaluating MacOS as a Linux/BSD user => ios-evaluation.gmi Evaluating iOS as a Linux/BSD user => systemd.gmi Issues with Systemd -=> framework-laptop.gmi Reviewing the Framework Laptop => run-your-own-email.gmi Run Your Own Email => design-patterns-and-cargo-culting.gmi Design Patterns and Cargo Culting => avoid-news-media.gmi Avoid News Media diff --git a/content/garden/plots/os-project.gmi b/content/garden/plots/os-project.gmi @@ -91,3 +91,7 @@ Don't change things for the sake of change, to make users struggle to find where ## Memory Management on Old OSes => http://basalgangster.macgui.com/RetroMacComputing/The_Long_View/Entries/2011/1/22_MoreMasters%3B.html + +## Another video series on making an OS + +=> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwPjvJ9ulSc&list=PLm3B56ql_akNcvH8vvJRYOc7TbYhRs19M diff --git a/content/garden/plots/philosophy-software-development.gmi b/content/garden/plots/philosophy-software-development.gmi @@ -41,3 +41,8 @@ Also, in open source you are not beholden to the people for whom you create thin => https://actsofvolition.com/2004/04/theriseof/ ^ this talks a lot about what I do in this post... and it's from 2004 + +=> https://xkcd.com/1172/ +=> https://malleable.systems/mission/#principles +=> https://trivial.technology/ +=> https://systemstack.dev/2022/05/waking-up/ diff --git a/content/links.md b/content/links.md @@ -18,6 +18,9 @@ more. * [Varieties of Argumentative Experience](https://slatestarcodex.com/2018/05/08/varieties-of-argumentative-experience/) - How to recognize and respond to various types of disagreements and arguments. +* [Apologies - making them](https://text.causal.agency/039-apologies.txt) - How + to make good and meaningful apologies. + ## Internet and Hacker Culture * [Hacker Laws](https://github.com/dwmkerr/hacker-laws) - "Laws, Theories, @@ -140,6 +143,8 @@ more. leaders and community members, we have no choice but to understand and adapt to this new landscape. +* [First as Tragedy, Then as Farce](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpAMbpQ8J7g) - What are the ethical implications of charitable giving in our cultural capitalism-based world? + ## Videos and Lectures * [The Missing Semester of Your CS Education](https://missing.csail.mit.edu/) - @@ -304,19 +309,11 @@ more. presenter attempts to explain the wacky and wonderful world of BSD in a Linux friendly way. -* [Ligatures in Programming Fonts: Hell - No](https://practicaltypography.com/ligatures-in-programming-fonts-hell-no.html) - - "Ligatures in programming fonts—a misguided trend I was hoping would - collapse under its own illogic. But it persists. Let me save you - some time—Ligatures in programming fonts are a terrible idea." +* [Ligatures in Programming Fonts: Hell No](https://practicaltypography.com/ligatures-in-programming-fonts-hell-no.html) - "Ligatures in programming fonts—a misguided trend I was hoping would collapse under its own illogic. But it persists. Let me save you some time—Ligatures in programming fonts are a terrible idea." ### Society -* [I’m a psychologist – and I believe we’ve been told devastating lies about - mental - health](https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/sep/06/psychologist-devastating-lies-mental-health-problems-politics) - - Society’s understanding of mental health issues locates the problem inside - the person – and ignores the politics of their distress +* [I’m a psychologist – and I believe we’ve been told devastating lies about mental health](https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/sep/06/psychologist-devastating-lies-mental-health-problems-politics) - Society’s understanding of mental health issues locates the problem inside the person – and ignores the politics of their distress ### Vim