paritybit.ca

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commit f86606da62b1c904ed6c491cd90f0d28056065b6
parent 2e762f1947396c6fda09dcaa3998720d5be6399d
Author: Jake Bauer <jbauer@paritybit.ca>
Date:   Wed, 18 Aug 2021 14:36:52 -0400

Update site

Diffstat:
Mpages/a-critique-of-free-software.md | 2+-
Mpages/blog.md | 57+++++++++++++++++++--------------------------------------
Mpages/blog/difficulty-of-privacy-education.md | 2+-
Mpages/blog/flip-phone-challenge.md | 9++++-----
Mpages/blog/i-like-perl.md | 10+++++-----
Apages/blog/laptops-suck-why-i-might-get-a-macbook-air.md | 254+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Mpages/blog/my-git-server-was-ddosed.md | 2+-
Mpages/blog/my-new-t420s.md | 2--
Mpages/blog/paying-for-software.md | 14+++++++-------
Mpages/blog/urxvt-to-st.md | 2--
Mpublic/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml | 257+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Apublic/img/m1-cpubenchmark.png | 0
Mpublic/sitemap.xml | 2+-
Mstyle/main.css | 223++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-------------------------------------
14 files changed, 668 insertions(+), 168 deletions(-)

diff --git a/pages/a-critique-of-free-software.md b/pages/a-critique-of-free-software.md @@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ <b>Written By:</b> Anonymous | <b>Posted:</b> 2021-05-08 | <b>Last Updated:</b> 2021-05-08 -</div><br> +</div> <p class="note">This essay was not authored by me. It is licensed under the <a href="https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/cc0">CC0 diff --git a/pages/blog.md b/pages/blog.md @@ -6,12 +6,14 @@ [//]: # -Welcome to the blog. Everything I've ever written and published for this site is -listed below. Please keep in mind that particularly old blog posts probably -won't reflect my current views, opinions, or ways of doing things and may -contain broken links. For more short-form content, you can find me on my -instance of the social/microblogging platform -[Pleroma](https://pleroma.paritybit.ca/jbauer). +Welcome to the blog! Most of what I have written and published for this site is +listed below (I have occasionally removed posts if I think they are low quality +or lack any valuable insight). Posts marked with a star ★ are blog posts I am +most proud of—either because I think they provide some valuable insight or +because I put a lot of effort into them. + +For more short-form content, you can find me on [the bsd.network Mastodon +instance](https://bsd.network/@jbauer). <a class="rss-icon" href="/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml"> <img src="/img/feed-icon.png" width="15" height="15" alt="Click for RSS"/> Subscribe with RSS</a> @@ -24,54 +26,39 @@ src="/img/feed-icon.png" width="15" height="15" alt="Click for RSS"/> Subscribe </form> <ul> - <li>2021-08-05 <a href="blog/mastodon-is-dead-long-live-misskey">Mastodon Is Dead, Long Live Misskey 🍮</a></li> + <li>2021-08-18 <a href="blog/laptops-suck-why-i-might-get-a-macbook-air">Laptops Suck (or Why I Might Get a New MacBook Air)</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2021-08-05 <a href="blog/mastodon-is-dead-long-live-misskey">Mastodon Is Dead, Long Live Misskey 🍮</a></li> <li>2021-02-17 <a href="blog/migrating-from-nginx-to-openbsd-httpd-and-relayd">Migrating from nginx to OpenBSD's httpd and relayd</a></li> <li>2020-12-10 <a href="blog/flip-phone-challenge-complete">Flip Phone Challenge Complete</a></li> <li>2020-11-30 <a href="blog/flip-phone-challenge">One Week Flip Phone Challenge</a></li> <li>2020-11-02 <a href="blog/gemini-is-up-and-running">Gemini is Up and Running</a></li> - <li>2020-09-24 <a href="blog/gomux-is-the-best-cli-matrix-client">Gomuks is the Best CLI Matrix Client</a></li> - <li>2020-08-30 <a href="blog/why-irc-is-still-good">Why IRC is Still Good in $CURRENT_YEAR</a></li> - <li>2020-08-29 <a href="blog/btw-i-use-arch">BTW, I Use Arch</a></li> - <li>2020-08-22 <a href="blog/setting-up-weechat-again">Setting Up WeeChat Again with weechat-matrix</a></li> - <li>2020-08-21 <a href="blog/my-top-10-most-used-commands">My Top 10 Most Used Commands</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-08-30 <a href="blog/why-irc-is-still-good">Why IRC is Still Good in $CURRENT_YEAR</a></li> <li>2020-08-14 <a href="blog/the-hacker-quarterly-magazine">The Hacker Quarterly Magazine</a></li> <li>2020-08-13 <a href="blog/ethical-investing">Ethical Investing</a></li> <li>2020-08-12 <a href="blog/choosing-an-investment-brokerage">Choosing An Investment Brokerage</a></li> - <li>2020-08-10 <a href="blog/my-preferred-fediverse-mobile-client">My Preferred Fediverse Mobile Client</a></li> <li>2020-08-09 <a href="blog/posting-statuses-on-pleroma-with-a-shell-script">Posting Statuses on Pleroma with a Shell Script</a></li> - <li>2020-08-08 <a href="blog/how-to-not-make-an-ass-of-yourself-internet-discussions">How to Not Make an Ass of Yourself in Online Discussions</a></li> <li>2020-08-08 <a href="blog/gentoo-isnt-for-me">Gentoo Isn't for Me</a></li> - <li>2020-08-06 <a href="blog/adding-image-optimization-to-my-static-site-generator">Adding Image Optimization to My Static Site Generator</a></li> - <li>2020-08-05 <a href="blog/use-xterm-256color-with-alacritty">Use xterm-256color With Alacritty For Better ls Output</a></li> - <li>2020-08-03 <a href="blog/my-journey-with-computers">My Journey With Computers</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-08-03 <a href="blog/my-journey-with-computers">My Journey With Computers</a></li> <li>2020-08-02 <a href="blog/vortex-vibe-keyboard">The Vortex ViBE Mechanical Keyboard</a></li> <li>2020-07-29 <a href="blog/my-git-server-was-ddosed">My Git Server Was DDoSed</a></li> <li>2020-07-25 <a href="blog/mastodon-to-pleroma-3-shutting-down-mastodon">Mastodon to Pleroma — 3 — Shutting Down Mastodon</a></li> <li>2020-07-23 <a href="blog/mastodon-to-pleroma-2-customizing-my-instance">Mastodon to Pleroma — 2 — Customizing My Instance</a></li> <li>2020-07-21 <a href="blog/mastodon-to-pleroma-1-setting-up-a-pleroma-server">Mastodon to Pleroma — 1 — Setting up a Pleroma Server</a></li> - <li>2020-07-19 <a href="blog/two-months-with-aerc">Two Months with aerc</a></li> - <li>2020-07-17 <a href="blog/my-attempts-to-fix-my-mastodon-instance">My Attempts to Fix My Mastodon Instance</a></li> - <li>2020-07-16 <a href="blog/why-i-hate-the-term-modern">Why I Hate The Term "Modern"</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-07-16 <a href="blog/why-i-hate-the-term-modern">Why I Hate The Term "Modern"</a></li> <li>2020-07-15 <a href="blog/be-a-good-netizen">Be A Good Netizen</a></li> <li>2020-07-14 <a href="blog/debian-with-btrfs">Installing Debian 10 Buster with Encrypted LVM and btrfs Subvolumes</a></li> <li>2020-07-13 <a href="blog/using-rm-with-trash">Using the "rm" Command with Trash</a></li> - <li>2020-07-13 <a href="blog/new-desktop-checklist">New Desktop Checklist</a></li> - <li>2020-07-12 <a href="blog/new-server-checklist">New Server Checklist</a></li> - <li>2020-07-12 <a href="blog/machine-hostnames">Machine Hostnames</a></li> <li>2020-07-11 <a href="blog/colours-for-gitea-issues">Colours for Gitea Issues</a></li> - <li>2020-07-09 <a href="blog/migrating-my-wiki-off-of-mediawiki">Migrating My Wiki Off of MediaWiki</a></li> <li>2020-07-08 <a href="blog/my-todo-solution">My TODO Solution</a></li> - <li>2020-07-07 <a href="blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time">Are TODO Applications a Waste of Time?</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-07-07 <a href="blog/are-todo-applications-a-waste-of-time">Are TODO Applications a Waste of Time?</a></li> <li>2020-07-06 <a href="blog/improving-blog-searching">Improving Blog Searching</a></li> <li>2020-07-05 <a href="blog/switching-to-cgit">Switching to cgit</a></li> <li>2020-07-04 <a href="blog/generating-my-geek-code">Generating My Geek Code</a></li> <li>2020-07-03 <a href="blog/adding-search-to-my-blog">Adding Search to my Blog</a></li> <li>2020-07-02 <a href="blog/a-month-and-a-half-of-self-hosted-email">A Month-and-a-Half of Self-Hosted Email</a></li> <li>2020-06-28 <a href="blog/how-i-keep-my-home-directory-clean">How I Keep My Home Directory Clean</a></li> - <li>2020-06-27 <a href="blog/my-first-ctf">My First CTF</a></li> <li>2020-06-26 <a href="blog/use-syncthing-to-sync-things">Use Syncthing to Sync Things</a></li> - <li>2020-06-26 <a href="blog/why-dwm-swallowing-cant-swallow-tmux">Why dwm's Window Swallowing Patch Can't Swallow tmux</a></li> - <li>2020-06-23 <a href="blog/switching-to-debian-sid">Switching to Debian Sid</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-06-26 <a href="blog/why-dwm-swallowing-cant-swallow-tmux">Why dwm's Window Swallowing Patch Can't Swallow tmux</a></li> <li>2020-06-22 <a href="blog/my-lwn-theme">My LWN Theme</a></li> <li>2020-06-21 <a href="blog/reflecting-on-50-days-of-blogging">Reflecting on 50 Days of Blogging</a></li> <li>2020-06-20 <a href="blog/how-to-create-an-rss-feed-for-your-blog-3">How to Create an RSS Feed for Your Blog — 3 — Automating Updates</a></li> @@ -87,16 +74,16 @@ src="/img/feed-icon.png" width="15" height="15" alt="Click for RSS"/> Subscribe <li>2020-06-09 <a href="blog/setting-up-a-status-page">Setting Up a Status Page</a></li> <li>2020-06-08 <a href="blog/scripting-my-way-to-success">Scripting My Way to Success</a></li> <li>2020-06-07 <a href="blog/curating-my-blogroll">Curating My Blogroll</a></li> - <li>2020-06-07 <a href="blog/why-email-is-the-best-discussion-platform">Why Email is the Best Discussion Platform</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-06-07 <a href="blog/why-email-is-the-best-discussion-platform">Why Email is the Best Discussion Platform</a></li> <li>2020-06-02 <a href="blog/toggling-between-indentation-styles-in-vim">Toggling Between Indentation Styles in Vim</a></li> <li>2020-06-02 <a href="blog/dnd-xp-system">My Custom XP System for DnD</a></li> <li>2020-05-31 <a href="blog/it-doesnt-have-to-be-perfect">It Doesn't Have to Be Perfect</a></li> <li>2020-05-29 <a href="blog/book-review-the-mediocre-programmer">Book Review: The Mediocre Programmer</a></li> <li>2020-05-28 <a href="blog/a-quick-rant-about-web-font-sizes">A Quick Rant About Web Font Sizes</a></li> <li>2020-05-27 <a href="blog/i-like-perl">I Like Perl</a></li> - <li>2020-05-26 <a href="blog/choosing-a-self-hosted-git-service">Choosing a Self-Hosted Git Service</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-05-26 <a href="blog/choosing-a-self-hosted-git-service">Choosing a Self-Hosted Git Service</a></li> <li>2020-05-25 <a href="blog/going-from-user-to-contributor-with-foss">Going From User to Contributor With FOSS</a></li> - <li>2020-05-25 <a href="blog/paying-for-software">Paying for Software</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-05-25 <a href="blog/paying-for-software">Paying for Software</a></li> <li>2020-05-23 <a href="blog/two-of-the-most-valuable-lessons-ive-learned">Two of the Most Valuable Lessons I've Learned</a></li> <li>2020-05-22 <a href="blog/rewriting-my-static-site-generator">Rewriting My Static Site Generator</a></li> <li>2020-05-19 <a href="blog/self-hosted-mail-now-live">Self-Hosted Email is Now Live!</a></li> @@ -110,24 +97,18 @@ src="/img/feed-icon.png" width="15" height="15" alt="Click for RSS"/> Subscribe <li>2020-05-11 <a href="blog/a-brief-review-of-fedora-32">A Brief Review of Fedora 32</a></li> <li>2020-05-10 <a href="blog/why-i-love-the-fediverse">Why I Love the Fediverse</a></li> <li>2020-05-09 <a href="blog/submitting-a-bug-report-to-freebsd">Submitting a Bug Report to FreeBSD</a></li> - <li>2020-05-08 <a href="blog/cat-v-considered-harmful">Cat -v Considered Harmful</a></li> - <li>2020-05-07 <a href="blog/the-joys-of-old-tech">The Joys of Old Tech</a></li> + <li class="blog-star">2020-05-07 <a href="blog/the-joys-of-old-tech">The Joys of Old Tech</a></li> <li>2020-05-05 <a href="blog/refining-my-neomutt-config">Refining My NeoMutt Configuration</a></li> - <li>2020-05-04 <a href="blog/clone-wars-finale">Star Wars: The Clone Wars Finale</a></li> <li>2020-05-03 <a href="blog/the-diefenbunker-museum">The Diefenbunker Museum</a></li> <li>2020-05-02 <a href="blog/the-disappearance-of-one">The Disappearance of <em>One</em></a></li> <li>2020-05-01 <a href="blog/caring-about-seo">Caring About SEO</a></li> - <li>2020-04-30 <a href="blog/i-got-more-ram">I Got More RAM!</a></li> <li>2020-04-28 <a href="blog/how-far-translation-tools-have-come">How Far Translation Tools Have Come</a></li> - <li>2020-04-27 <a href="blog/tweaking-some-css">Tweaking Some CSS</a></li> - <li>2020-04-26 <a href="blog/how-much-ram-is-enough">I Ran Out of RAM... Again</a></li> <li>2020-04-25 <a href="blog/why-i-blog">Why I Blog and #100DaysToOffload</a></li> <li>2020-04-11 <a href="blog/decommissioning-my-rackmount-server">Decommissioning My Rackmount Server</a></li> <li>2020-02-28 <a href="blog/logo-redesign">Redesigning My Website's Logo</a></li> <li>2020-02-24 <a href="blog/making-my-own-vim-statusline">Making My Own Vim Statusline</a></li> <li>2020-02-14 <a href="blog/urxvt-to-st">Switching from urxvt to st</a></li> <li>2020-02-06 <a href="blog/website-redesign">Making My Website More Accessible</a></li> - <li>2019-12-30 <a href="blog/automating-publishing">Automating the Publishing of Articles</a></li> <li>2019-12-20 <a href="blog/difficulty-of-privacy-education">The Difficulty of Educating People About Online Privacy</a></li> <li>2019-11-23 <a href="blog/china">China</a></li> <li>2019-06-20 <a href="blog/qutebrowser-to-firefox">Why I Switched Back to diff --git a/pages/blog/difficulty-of-privacy-education.md b/pages/blog/difficulty-of-privacy-education.md @@ -81,4 +81,4 @@ choices could cause them significant harm. I'd be interested to know what, if any, strategies you have for discussing online privacy with others. Let me know by [sending me an -email](mailto:feedback@paritybit.ca). +email](mailto:jbauer@paritybit.ca). diff --git a/pages/blog/flip-phone-challenge.md b/pages/blog/flip-phone-challenge.md @@ -21,12 +21,11 @@ I normally carry with me an ASUS Zenfone II Laser Android smartphone running LineageOS 15.1. It has served me well over the past 5 years and its battery still lasts me a whole day... mostly. The things I normally do on my phone are: call, text, use a Web browser, use the Element, Conversations, and Husky -applications, and check the weather if I'm bored. I sometimes listen to podcasts -with it but I've stopped in recent months. I also have the OsmAnd~ map +applications, and check the weather if I'm bored. I sometimes listen to +podcasts with it but I've stopped in recent months. I also have the OsmAnd~ map application, but GPS stopped working on my phone some time ago and I rarely, if -ever, open it. (I'm proud to say I didn't use it even once when I moved from -Ottawa to Toronto!) I don't even take pictures on my phone anymore thanks to -some weird fogging that's happened to the camera lens. +ever, open it. I don't even take pictures on my phone anymore thanks to some +weird fogging that's happened to the camera lens. For this challenge, I've chosen a Doro PhoneEasy 612. Pretty much entirely because it's what I had on hand. There's nothing special about it, it's a diff --git a/pages/blog/i-like-perl.md b/pages/blog/i-like-perl.md @@ -43,11 +43,11 @@ killing the script when something doesn't work with `or die`, and outputting to stderr with `warn`. There's also this indescribable feeling of joy I get whenever I program in Perl -(and, by extension, in shell script). The freedom that I have to solve a problem -and the ability to do it in so many different ways engages my brain in ways that -other languages like Lua and Python don't. Perl is still a true-to-its-name -scripting language, and the fact that its available on just about every platform -means that scripts written in Perl are usually portable by default. +(and, by extension, in shell script). The freedom that I have to solve a +problem and the ability to do it in so many different ways engages my brain in +ways that other languages like Python don't. Perl is still a true-to-its-name +scripting language, and the fact that its available on just about every +platform means that scripts written in Perl are usually portable by default. Perl has a reputation for being a write-only language because of the number of scripts which use esoteric, hard to read, symbol-based syntax. Perl doesn't have diff --git a/pages/blog/laptops-suck-why-i-might-get-a-macbook-air.md b/pages/blog/laptops-suck-why-i-might-get-a-macbook-air.md @@ -0,0 +1,254 @@ +## Laptops Suck (or Why I Might Get a New MacBook Air) + +[//]: # "PC Laptops are trash and I'm considering getting a MacBook. Here's why." + +[//]: # "main.min.css" + +[//]: # + +<div class="byline"> +<b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | + <b>Posted:</b> 2021-08-18 | + <b>Last Updated:</b> 2021-08-18 +</div> + +<p class="note">TL;DR: Watch this <a +href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0DIHlnD_S0">video by Wolfgang's +Channel</a>. It covers just about everything I talk about in this post, +including the negative aspects of the M1 MacBook Air, minus the personal +context and rant about modern laptops.</p> + +If you've been a part of the computing industry in almost any aspect for a +while, you'll no doubt know about the trend of laptops becoming worse as time +goes on. What used to be upgradable components became soldered, removable +batteries became internalized and eventually glued in, and build quality +decreased year over year. Nowadays, one seems to have two choices in the PC +laptop market: buy a cheap, creaky mess of plastic with low-performance +internals, or buy a possibly well-built yet overpriced laptop that may perform +well, but does so at the cost of noise and usually battery life. + +Frankly, the only ones offering a viable alternative to this mess is Apple. + +Yep, you heard me right. + +Apple used to be just as bad as the rest: you used to get an overheating, +_horrendously_ overpriced (a fully-specced 16" MacBook Pro would run you $4,000 +USD!) laptop with a terrible keyboard, but with their M1 chip this has changed +completely. You can now get a laptop that not only has outstanding build +quality, all-day battery life, an excellent screen, a great keyboard, and +**desktop-level** performance, but at **half the price** of comparable PC +laptops while also being **fanless**. + +If that hasn't yet convinced you, keep reading. + +### Price to Performance + +I think we can all agree that Macs had pretty terrible price to performance +when they used Intel processors. Given that a 2020 base model MacBook Air was +$999 USD yet had a CPU that fared not much better than my current Lenovo +Thinkpad T420s in benchmarks and overheated so fast you couldn't even get +remotely close to its full performance... yeah, that was pretty bad. However, +this has completely changed with the M1. Now we have a $999 laptop with +performance comparable to many Ryzen desktop systems that sips power and, yes +will heat up if you're doing heavy tasks, but won't take massive hits to +performance just because it can't handle the heat. + +<figure> + <a href="/img/m1-cpubenchmark.png"><img src="/img/m1-cpubenchmark.png" + alt="Benchmark comparison of the M1 chip next to several Ryzen desktop + chips on cpubenchmark.net"/></a> + <caption><a href="https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Apple-M1-8-Core-3200-MHz-vs-AMD-Ryzen-5-1600-vs-AMD-Ryzen-5-3600X-vs-AMD-Ryzen-5-5600X-vs-AMD-Ryzen-9-5950X/4104vs2984vs3494vs3859vs3862">Source of this comparison.</a></caption> +</figure> + +In the image above, the M1 is compared to the Ryzen 5 1600 (the same CPU I have +in my desktop computer from 2017), and the Ryzen 5 3600X, Ryzen 5 5600X, and +Ryzen 9 5950X. This benchmark clocks the M1 chip at being overall faster than +the Ryzen 5 1600, and even still beating the Ryzen 9 5950X in single-core +computations (though, of course, the 32 threads in the 5950X means it's much +better at multi-threaded stuff than the M1 with its 8). That means this mobile +CPU which can fit in a fanless system and draws a meagre 15.1 Watts is more +powerful than a 65 Watt TDP desktop CPU from 2017 and 2018 as well as +competitive in single-core tasks with even recent Ryzen CPUs. + +Further videos on the internet comparing performance such as [this video from +LTT](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KE-hrWTgDjk) and [this video from +Wolfgang's Channel](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0DIHlnD_S0) shows that, +while the M1 trades blows with its AMD and Intel counterparts in some cases, it +drastically outperforms almost all of the competition. For most of what I will +be doing with the PC, the M1 Air absolutely blows my existing computers out of +the water in terms of performance for less than the amount of money I spent on +my desktop system in 2017 and in a—I can't stress this enough—**fanless +laptop**. + +### Build Quality and Keyboard + +Macs tend to have excellent physical build quality. There is little to no flex +of the chassis when typing on the keyboard, the screen doesn't wobble when you +adjust it or while you're typing, and you can hold the laptop by a corner +without creaking plastic noises. Since they switched to their Magic Keyboard™®© +from their utter disaster the Butterfly Keyboard™®©, their keyboards also feel +very nice to type on again and won't spontaneously break from normal usage. + +According to a friend of mine who switched from a Thinkpad X1 Carbon Gen. 6 to +an M1 MacBook Air, the keyboard is miles better than not only that, but also +Cherry MX switches. According to the aforementioned video from Wolfgang's +Channel, the keyboard is not as good as his Thinkpad X1 Carbon's. So, while it +does seem to be a matter of personal preference, if this keyboard is anything +like their early 2010s MacBook keyboards (a keyboard I have actually used) then +it will feel, to me, even better than even my T420s keyboard. + +### Fanless Operation + +I know I keep going on about how the Air is fanless, but that's actually +something I would really like to have in a laptop. My current T420s is hot and +loud and it really shows it. Just sitting on the desktop, at idle, the CPU is +at about 45°C with the fan audible. When I'm browsing the web, it easily spikes +to 60% or 80% utilization, and it's not uncommon for the CPU to hit 85°C and +the fan to be going full-speed if I'm flipping back and forth between tabs or +on any particularly heavy tabs (yes, I've cleaned out and re-pasted this +computer... twice). This is such a problem that my laptop will overheat if I +have it on my lap without wearing long pants (i.e. the bottom of the laptop is +touching my legs) for an extended period of time and the amount of heat put +out by this machine has even bothered people who sit next to me as I use my +computer. Modern laptops might be better, but they're still annoyingly noisy +when doing anything intensive. + +Having a fanless laptop will certainly be a luxury. When using my laptop on the +couch or in bed, I won't have to worry about whether or not the fans can +breathe, I won't have to worry about the fan noise of my laptop or the blast of +heat shooting out the side annoying anybody near me, and I won't have to worry +about cleaning out the computer every two to three years just to keep it +running well. + +### The Screen + +Since Apple released their Retina™®© displays, they have been known for making +stunningly good displays. They continue this trend with the M1 MacBooks by +putting a 2560x1600 (that's a 16:10 display ratio, much nicer than 16:9 for +productivity), in a 13.3" screen for a wonderfully crisp 227 PPI. Not only will +this be way better than my current 1600x900 display in a 14" screen, it will +also be far better than the 1920x1080 displays one could normally get on +competing laptops (without spending out a lot more money). + +A good screen with sharp text is something I've wanted for a long time since +using 4K 27" displays at work and since I read [this blog post by Nikita on +tonsky.me about better monitors](https://tonsky.me/blog/monitors/). It makes a +huge difference, especially for those who work primarily with text (me) in +terms of comfort and clarity. + +### Battery Life + +One thing that Apple has pretty much always been good at is jamming massive +batteries into their laptops. If I had to guess based on pictures of internals, +more than 50% of the internal space of a MacBook is taken up by batteries. This +gives them battery lifetimes often much greater than competing laptops of +similar performance. In the case of the M1, this is dialed up to the maximum +because they combined their regular massive battery capacity with a chip that +sips power. One can easily go a full day using their M1 MacBook without needing +to charge their laptop. This is a huge upgrade from my Thinkpad which gets +about 1 hour of battery life on a replacement battery purchased just one year +ago (turns out that having a CPU that gets hit with regular near-100% +utilization is not great for battery life). + +### MacOS + +I know a lot of Linux and Windows users look at MacOS and think: "How could +anybody use _that_!?" I know, I used to be one of them. At work when I got a +Mac (a 2013 Mac Pro, to be precise) I was just endlessly frustrated at how +MacOS felt. In reality, I just had a closed mind and wanted to hate it, so I +did. Of course, a completely different operating system and desktop environment +requires some effort to learn and get used to; exactly what we tell people +switching over from Windows to Linux. + +In reality, MacOS is a competent *nix system. It's based on Darwin BSD, has zsh +as a default shell—with others also installed, has its own package manager +[homebrew](https://brew.sh), and has a perfectly competent terminal emulator. +In reality, I can do everything I would want to do on my computer on MacOS +without having to go through the hoops required on Windows. + +Not to mention, my printer+scanner will actually work without endless fiddling +or needing to reboot into Windows. + +### But It's Apple!!! + +Yeah, I know. Apple is not a good company. They are consistently against [right +to repair](https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/what-is-right-to-repair/), +lock down the upgradablilty and repairability of their products, and the +majority of the operating system is proprietary (though, it's worth noting that +they're still far better than Microsoft when it comes to [their open source +efforts](https://opensource.apple.com/), having made and released WebKit, CUPS, +Bonjour, and more). + +But this isn't much different than most of the PC manufacturers. With many +modern laptops you are quite limited in terms of what you can upgrade. For +most, you can upgrade the SSD and the RAM and that's about it. Many parts for +discontinued laptops are also hard to come by or expensive, unless they were +insanely popular. + +It's also worth noting that, in the case of the M1, you can't upgrade the RAM +because it is a system-on-chip (SoC) design similar to how the Pinebook and +most ARM-based computers are built. However, that's not really an issue since +MacOS handles low memory conditions very well and I personally have no need for +more than 16GB of RAM. I haven't needed more than 16GB of RAM for half a decade +and I don't see that changing anytime soon given that I routinely use less than +4GB on my workstations. + +### Alternative Options + +So, if I'm looking for a high quality, performant laptop for a good price then +what are my other options in today's market? + +If I really want a fanless design I could either get a Chromebook or a +Microsoft Surface. The Chromebooks universally suffer from terrible build +quality or awful performance and the Surface laptops might be quite good +(relatively speaking), but then I'm stuck with a product locked down by +Microsoft and I much prefer MacOS to Windows. Surface computers also suffer +from exactly the same repairability issues as Apple computers. + +If I want something that does perform well and is well-built then I suppose I +could go with a Dell XPS. They are "the MacBooks of the PCs" in terms of their +build quality after all. But they're also over twice the price as the M1 Air +with worse performance and they can get very loud when doing intensive tasks +like compiling software. If you're thinking: "Why not get a Thinkpad," it's +because modern Thinkpads have terrible build quality and are also monumentally +more expensive than these new MacBooks for the performance you get. They suffer +from the same problems as the XPS but aren't even well-built. + +Finally, in terms of a decent laptop that is repairable and upgradable, there +is the new Framework laptop. While this does seem quite promising, it's hot (it +has an Intel processor) and doesn't offer anywhere near the price to +performance of these new MacBooks (once again, it has an Intel processor), +though they are at least a strong competitor. The build quality, while decent, +is also [still lacking compared to +Apple](https://jcs.org/2021/08/06/framework#hardware). + +### Summary + +All in all, the pros of an M1 MacBook Air far outweigh the cons. Let's go over them: + +* **Fanless** - It's silent and no need to worry about airflow or cleaning +* **Excellent** build quality - Not a plastic piece of e-waste (looking at you, Clevo chassis-resellers) +* **Great battery life** - Easily all-day battery life, even when using it intensively +* **Good keyboard** - Something that I'll actually enjoy typing on when I'm away from home +* **Outstanding Performance** - Competitive with Ryzen 7 2700s in multi-core, and the latest Ryzen processors in single-core performance +* **No T2 Chip** - The M1 computers no longer have the annoying T2 chip, so other OSes could conceivably be installed in the future +* **Unbeatable Price** - Competing laptops are twice the price or more, for worse performance, build quality, noise, or a combination of those +* **No Touchbar** - I don't like the touchbar, so I'm glad the Air doesn't have it +* **Thin as heck** - It's a laptop as powerful as a desktop, thinner than the screen on my T420s + +And what about the cons: + +* **Apple** - They're a bad company, and it doesn't make me feel good to buy something from them +* **Non-replaceable SSD** - The SSD could wear out and you can't easily replace them which would render the computer useless, but this probably won't matter in the lifetime of the device, since one would have to write terabytes of data to their SSD each day to even come close to wearing it out in a couple of years. + +I've never owned a Mac (or any Apple product, for that matter). I currently own +a T420s because I like the aesthetics and keyboards of old Thinkpads but, +honestly, it's just not cutting it anymore. A decade old computer is finally +starting to show its age and it's time for an upgrade. When nearly every other +option on the market (including recent second-hand laptops) aside from the M1 +Macs kinda suck, well, I'm going to choose the best option for the money I have +and right now that looks like it's the M1 MacBook Air. + +<p class="note">Expect a follow-up post to this one addressing feedback, +questions, and other criticisms in response to this post. But, please, if +you're going to respond to this, don't just respond with blind Apple hate.</p> diff --git a/pages/blog/my-git-server-was-ddosed.md b/pages/blog/my-git-server-was-ddosed.md @@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ index page of my git server and I changed the robots setting in `cgitrc` to `robots=none` to prevent the site from being indexed. Unfortunately, that didn't help one bit. When a bot ignores robots directives, -it's more than likely a malicious bot (or at the very least, one made by an +it's more than likely a malicious bot (or, at the very least, one made by an incompetent programmer). My next action was to set up Fail2Ban to catch these malicious actors and ban them for a number of hours from accessing my server. So I set up an `nginx-badbots` filter (by copying the `apache-badbots` filter and diff --git a/pages/blog/my-new-t420s.md b/pages/blog/my-new-t420s.md @@ -12,8 +12,6 @@ <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-06-26 </div> -_**Update**: Add two new photographs from after the trackpad sticker arrived._ - Two days ago I picked up a Thinkpad T420s laptop from a local seller for $150 CAD[1] after spontaneously deciding to look through Kijiji (the Canadian version of Craigslist or Gumtree). In the package were two 65W power adapters, the diff --git a/pages/blog/paying-for-software.md b/pages/blog/paying-for-software.md @@ -13,13 +13,13 @@ </div> Most of the world now runs on free software; that's free as in freedom, not -necessarily free as in beer. It seems though, that many people conflate the two -meanings and expect free and open source software to also come free of charge. -This is despite none of the widely accepted free and open source software -licenses including a non-commercial clause. In fact, the -[GPL](https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0.html) (section 6) explicitly includes -language which would allow one make money off of one's software while still -keeping it free and open source. +necessarily free as in beer. It seems though, that many people conflate the +two meanings and expect free and open source software to also come free of +charge. This is despite none of the widely accepted free and open source +software licenses including a non-commercial clause. In fact, the +[GPL](https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0.html) (section 6) explicitly +includes language which would allow one to make money off of one's software +while still keeping it free and open source. It is also often brought up that Big Tech tends to use free and open source software in their own products, which they then proceed to sell, and that this diff --git a/pages/blog/urxvt-to-st.md b/pages/blog/urxvt-to-st.md @@ -12,8 +12,6 @@ <b>Last Updated:</b> 2020-02-15 </div> -_**Update:** Reworded paragraph on trying other terminals._ - I spend most of my time working in the terminal. Whether it's email with Neomutt, music with ncmpcpp, programming with Neovim, or administrating my systems, I feel the most comfortable and in control when using the terminal. diff --git a/public/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml b/public/feeds/sitewide-feed.xml @@ -7,6 +7,263 @@ <description>The feed that covers all notable additions, updates, announcements, and other changes for the entire paritybit.ca website.</description> <item> + <title>Laptops Suck (or Why I Might Get a New MacBook Air)</title> + <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/laptops-suck-why-i-might-get-a-macbook-air</link> + <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/laptops-suck-why-i-might-get-a-macbook-air</guid> + <pubDate>Wed, 18 Aug 2021 10:19:21 -0400</pubDate> + <description><![CDATA[<h2 id="Laptops%20Suck%20(or%20Why%20I%20Might%20Get%20a%20New%20MacBook%20Air)">Laptops Suck (or Why I Might Get a New MacBook Air)</h2> + +<div class="byline"> +<b>Written By:</b> Jake Bauer | + <b>Posted:</b> 2021-08-18 | + <b>Last Updated:</b> 2021-08-18 +</div> + +<p class="note">TL;DR: Watch this <a +href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0DIHlnD_S0">video by Wolfgang's +Channel</a>. It covers just about everything I talk about in this post, +including the negative aspects of the M1 MacBook Air, minus the personal +context and rant about modern laptops.</p> + +<p>If you&#8217;ve been a part of the computing industry in almost any aspect for a +while, you&#8217;ll no doubt know about the trend of laptops becoming worse as time +goes on. What used to be upgradable components became soldered, removable +batteries became internalized and eventually glued in, and build quality +decreased year over year. Nowadays, one seems to have two choices in the PC +laptop market: buy a cheap, creaky mess of plastic with low-performance +internals, or buy a possibly well-built yet overpriced laptop that may perform +well, but does so at the cost of noise and usually battery life.</p> + +<p>Frankly, the only ones offering a viable alternative to this mess is Apple.</p> + +<p>Yep, you heard me right.</p> + +<p>Apple used to be just as bad as the rest: you used to get an overheating, +<em>horrendously</em> overpriced (a fully-specced 16&#8221; MacBook Pro would run you $4,000 +USD!) laptop with a terrible keyboard, but with their M1 chip this has changed +completely. You can now get a laptop that not only has outstanding build +quality, all-day battery life, an excellent screen, a great keyboard, and +<strong>desktop-level</strong> performance, but at <strong>half the price</strong> of comparable PC +laptops while also being <strong>fanless</strong>.</p> + +<p>If that hasn&#8217;t yet convinced you, keep reading.</p> + +<h3 id="Price%20to%20Performance">Price to Performance</h3> + +<p>I think we can all agree that Macs had pretty terrible price to performance +when they used Intel processors. Given that a 2020 base model MacBook Air was +$999 USD yet had a CPU that fared not much better than my current Lenovo +Thinkpad T420s in benchmarks and overheated so fast you couldn&#8217;t even get +remotely close to its full performance&#8230; yeah, that was pretty bad. However, +this has completely changed with the M1. Now we have a $999 laptop with +performance comparable to many Ryzen desktop systems that sips power and, yes +will heat up if you&#8217;re doing heavy tasks, but won&#8217;t take massive hits to +performance just because it can&#8217;t handle the heat.</p> + +<figure> + <a href="/img/m1-cpubenchmark.png"><img src="/img/m1-cpubenchmark.png" + alt="Benchmark comparison of the M1 chip next to several Ryzen desktop + chips on cpubenchmark.net"/></a> +</figure> + +<p>In the image above, the M1 is compared to the Ryzen 5 1600 (the same CPU I have +in my desktop computer from 2017), and the Ryzen 5 3600X, Ryzen 5 5600X, and +Ryzen 9 5950X. This benchmark clocks the M1 chip at being overall faster than +the Ryzen 5 1600, and even still beating the Ryzen 9 5950X in single-core +computations (though, of course, the 32 threads in the 5950X means it&#8217;s much +better at multi-threaded stuff than the M1 with its 8). That means this mobile +CPU which can fit in a fanless system and draws a meagre 15.1 Watts is more +powerful than a 65 Watt TDP desktop CPU from 2017 and 2018 as well as +competitive in single-core tasks with even recent Ryzen CPUs.</p> + +<p>Further videos on the internet comparing performance such as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KE-hrWTgDjk">this video from +LTT</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0DIHlnD_S0">this video from +Wolfgang&#8217;s Channel</a> shows that, +while the M1 trades blows with its AMD and Intel counterparts in some cases, it +drastically outperforms almost all of the competition. For most of what I will +be doing with the PC, the M1 Air absolutely blows my existing computers out of +the water in terms of performance for less than the amount of money I spent on +my desktop system in 2017 and in a—I can&#8217;t stress this enough—<strong>fanless +laptop</strong>.</p> + +<h3 id="Build%20Quality%20and%20Keyboard">Build Quality and Keyboard</h3> + +<p>Macs tend to have excellent physical build quality. There is little to no flex +of the chassis when typing on the keyboard, the screen doesn&#8217;t wobble when you +adjust it or while you&#8217;re typing, and you can hold the laptop by a corner +without creaking plastic noises. Since they switched to their Magic Keyboard™®© +from their utter disaster the Butterfly Keyboard™®©, their keyboards also feel +very nice to type on again and won&#8217;t spontaneously break from normal usage.</p> + +<p>According to a friend of mine who switched from a Thinkpad X1 Carbon Gen. 6 to +an M1 MacBook Air, the keyboard is miles better than not only that, but also +Cherry MX switches. According to the aforementioned video from Wolfgang&#8217;s +Channel, the keyboard is not as good as his Thinkpad X1 Carbon&#8217;s. So, while it +does seem to be a matter of personal preference, if this keyboard is anything +like their early 2010s MacBook keyboards (a keyboard I have actually used) then +it will feel, to me, even better than even my T420s keyboard.</p> + +<h3 id="Fanless%20Operation">Fanless Operation</h3> + +<p>I know I keep going on about how the Air is fanless, but that&#8217;s actually +something I would really like to have in a laptop. My current T420s is hot and +loud and it really shows it. Just sitting on the desktop, at idle, the CPU is +at about 45°C with the fan audible. When I&#8217;m browsing the web, it easily spikes +to 60% or 80% utilization, and it&#8217;s not uncommon for the CPU to hit 85°C and +the fan to be going full-speed if I&#8217;m flipping back and forth between tabs or +on any particularly heavy tabs (yes, I&#8217;ve cleaned out and re-pasted this +computer&#8230; twice). This is such a problem that my laptop will overheat if I +have it on my lap without wearing long pants (i.e. the bottom of the laptop is +touching my legs) for an extended period of time and the amount of heat put +out by this machine has even bothered people who sit next to me as I use my +computer. Modern laptops might be better, but they&#8217;re still annoyingly noisy +when doing anything intensive.</p> + +<p>Having a fanless laptop will certainly be a luxury. When using my laptop on the +couch or in bed, I won&#8217;t have to worry about whether or not the fans can +breathe, I won&#8217;t have to worry about the fan noise of my laptop or the blast of +heat shooting out the side annoying anybody near me, and I won&#8217;t have to worry +about cleaning out the computer every two to three years just to keep it +running well.</p> + +<h3 id="The%20Screen">The Screen</h3> + +<p>Since Apple released their Retina™®© displays, they have been known for making +stunningly good displays. They continue this trend with the M1 MacBooks by +putting a 2560x1600 (that&#8217;s a 16:10 display ratio, much nicer than 16:9 for +productivity), in a 13.3&#8221; screen for a wonderfully crisp 227 PPI. Not only will +this be way better than my current 1600x900 display in a 14&#8221; screen, it will +also be far better than the 1920x1080 displays one could normally get on +competing laptops (without spending out a lot more money).</p> + +<p>A good screen with sharp text is something I&#8217;ve wanted for a long time since +using 4K 27&#8221; displays at work and since I read <a href="https://tonsky.me/blog/monitors/">this blog post by Nikita on +tonsky.me about better monitors</a>. It makes a +huge difference, especially for those who work primarily with text (me) in +terms of comfort and clarity.</p> + +<h3 id="Battery%20Life">Battery Life</h3> + +<p>One thing that Apple has pretty much always been good at is jamming massive +batteries into their laptops. If I had to guess based on pictures of internals, +more than 50% of the internal space of a MacBook is taken up by batteries. This +gives them battery lifetimes often much greater than competing laptops of +similar performance. In the case of the M1, this is dialed up to the maximum +because they combined their regular massive battery capacity with a chip that +sips power. One can easily go a full day using their M1 MacBook without needing +to charge their laptop. This is a huge upgrade from my Thinkpad which gets +about 1 hour of battery life on a replacement battery purchased just one year +ago (turns out that having a CPU that gets hit with regular near-100% +utilization is not great for battery life).</p> + +<h3 id="MacOS">MacOS</h3> + +<p>I know a lot of Linux and Windows users look at MacOS and think: &#8220;How could +anybody use <em>that</em>!?&#8221; I know, I used to be one of them. At work when I got a +Mac (a 2013 Mac Pro, to be precise) I was just endlessly frustrated at how +MacOS felt. In reality, I just had a closed mind and wanted to hate it, so I +did. Of course, a completely different operating system and desktop environment +requires some effort to learn and get used to; exactly what we tell people +switching over from Windows to Linux.</p> + +<p>In reality, MacOS is a competent *nix system. It&#8217;s based on Darwin BSD, has zsh +as a default shell—with others also installed, has its own package manager +<a href="https://brew.sh">homebrew</a>, and has a perfectly competent terminal emulator. +In reality, I can do everything I would want to do on my computer on MacOS +without having to go through the hoops required on Windows.</p> + +<p>Not to mention, my printer+scanner will actually work without endless fiddling +or needing to reboot into Windows.</p> + +<h3 id="But%20It&amp;#8217;s%20Apple!!!">But It&#8217;s Apple!!!</h3> + +<p>Yeah, I know. Apple is not a good company. They are consistently against <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/blog/what-is-right-to-repair/">right +to repair</a>, +lock down the upgradablilty and repairability of their products, and the +majority of the operating system is proprietary (though, it&#8217;s worth noting that +they&#8217;re still far better than Microsoft when it comes to <a href="https://opensource.apple.com/">their open source +efforts</a>, having made and released WebKit, CUPS, +Bonjour, and more).</p> + +<p>But this isn&#8217;t much different than most of the PC manufacturers. With many +modern laptops you are quite limited in terms of what you can upgrade. For +most, you can upgrade the SSD and the RAM and that&#8217;s about it. Many parts for +discontinued laptops are also hard to come by or expensive, unless they were +insanely popular.</p> + +<p>It&#8217;s also worth noting that, in the case of the M1, you can&#8217;t upgrade the RAM +because it is a system-on-chip (SoC) design similar to how the Pinebook and +most ARM-based computers are built. However, that&#8217;s not really an issue since +MacOS handles low memory conditions very well and I personally have no need for +more than 16GB of RAM. I haven&#8217;t needed more than 16GB of RAM for half a decade +and I don&#8217;t see that changing anytime soon given that I routinely use less than +4GB on my workstations.</p> + +<h3 id="Alternative%20Options">Alternative Options</h3> + +<p>So, if I&#8217;m looking for a high quality, performant laptop for a good price then +what are my other options in today&#8217;s market?</p> + +<p>If I really want a fanless design I could either get a Chromebook or a +Microsoft Surface. The Chromebooks universally suffer from terrible build +quality or awful performance and the Surface laptops might be quite good +(relatively speaking), but then I&#8217;m stuck with a product locked down by +Microsoft and I much prefer MacOS to Windows. Surface computers also suffer +from exactly the same repairability issues as Apple computers.</p> + +<p>If I want something that does perform well and is well-built then I suppose I +could go with a Dell XPS. They are &#8220;the MacBooks of the PCs&#8221; in terms of their +build quality after all. But they&#8217;re also over twice the price as the M1 Air +with worse performance and they can get very loud when doing intensive tasks +like compiling software. If you&#8217;re thinking: &#8220;Why not get a Thinkpad,&#8221; it&#8217;s +because modern Thinkpads have terrible build quality and are also monumentally +more expensive than these new MacBooks for the performance you get. They suffer +from the same problems as the XPS but aren&#8217;t even well-built.</p> + +<p>Finally, in terms of a decent laptop that is repairable and upgradable, there +is the new Framework laptop. While this does seem quite promising, it&#8217;s hot (it +has an Intel processor) and doesn&#8217;t offer anywhere near the price to +performance of these new MacBooks (once again, it has an Intel processor), +though they are at least a strong competitor. The build quality, while decent, +is also <a href="https://jcs.org/2021/08/06/framework#hardware">still lacking compared to +Apple</a>.</p> + +<h3 id="Summary">Summary</h3> + +<p>All in all, the pros of an M1 MacBook Air far outweigh the cons. Let&#8217;s go over them:</p> + +<ul> +<li><strong>Fanless</strong> - It&#8217;s silent and no need to worry about airflow or cleaning</li> +<li><strong>Excellent</strong> build quality - Not a plastic piece of e-waste (looking at you, Clevo chassis-resellers)</li> +<li><strong>Great battery life</strong> - Easily all-day battery life, even when using it intensively</li> +<li><strong>Good keyboard</strong> - Something that I&#8217;ll actually enjoy typing on when I&#8217;m away from home</li> +<li><strong>Outstanding Performance</strong> - Competitive with Ryzen 7 2700s in multi-core, and the latest Ryzen processors in single-core performance</li> +<li><strong>No T2 Chip</strong> - The M1 computers no longer have the annoying T2 chip, so other OSes could conceivably be installed in the future</li> +<li><strong>Unbeatable Price</strong> - Competing laptops are twice the price or more, for worse performance, build quality, noise, or a combination of those</li> +<li><strong>No Touchbar</strong> - I don&#8217;t like the touchbar, so I&#8217;m glad the Air doesn&#8217;t have it</li> +<li><strong>Thin as heck</strong> - It&#8217;s a laptop as powerful as a desktop, thinner than the screen on my T420s</li> +</ul> + +<p>And what about the cons:</p> + +<ul> +<li><strong>Apple</strong> - They&#8217;re a bad company, and it doesn&#8217;t make me feel good to buy something from them</li> +<li><strong>Non-replaceable SSD</strong> - The SSD could wear out and you can&#8217;t easily replace them which would render the computer useless, but this probably won&#8217;t matter in the lifetime of the device, since one would have to write terabytes of data to their SSD each day to even come close to wearing it out in a couple of years.</li> +</ul> + +<p>I&#8217;ve never owned a Mac (or any Apple product, for that matter). I currently own +a T420s because I like the aesthetics and keyboards of old Thinkpads but, +honestly, it&#8217;s just not cutting it anymore. A decade old computer is finally +starting to show its age and it&#8217;s time for an upgrade. When nearly every other +option on the market (including recent second-hand laptops) aside from the M1 +Macs kinda suck, well, I&#8217;m going to choose the best option for the money I have +and right now that looks like it&#8217;s the M1 MacBook Air.</p> + +<p class="note">Expect a follow-up post to this one addressing feedback, +questions, and other criticisms in response to this post. But, please, if +you're going to respond to this, don't just respond with blind Apple hate.</p>]]></description> + </item> +<item> <title>Mastodon Is Dead, Long Live Misskey 🍮</title> <link>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/mastodon-is-dead-long-live-misskey</link> <guid>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/mastodon-is-dead-long-live-misskey</guid> diff --git a/public/img/m1-cpubenchmark.png b/public/img/m1-cpubenchmark.png Binary files differ. diff --git a/public/sitemap.xml b/public/sitemap.xml @@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/home</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog</loc></url> - <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/mastodon-is-dead-long-live-misskey</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/migrating-from-nginx-to-openbsd-httpd-and-relayd</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/flip-phone-challenge-complete</loc></url> + <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/laptops-suck-why-i-might-get-a-macbook-air</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/mastodon-is-dead-long-live-misskey</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/migrating-from-nginx-to-openbsd-httpd-and-relayd</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/flip-phone-challenge-complete</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/flip-phone-challenge</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/gemini-is-up-and-running</loc></url> <url><loc>https://www.paritybit.ca/blog/gomux-is-the-best-cli-matrix-client</loc></url> diff --git a/style/main.css b/style/main.css @@ -1,207 +1,220 @@ html { - scrollbar-color: #83b3d8 transparent; 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